Bone metabolism has been rarely investigated in children affected by Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Aim of the present study was to assess bone mineral metabolism in children and adults NF1 patients, to determine the relevant factors potentially involved in the development of reduced bone mineral density (BMD), and provide possible therapeutic intervention in NF1 patients. 114 NF1 patients and sex and age matched controls were enrolled into the study. Clinical and biochemical factors reflecting bone metabolism were evaluated. Factors potentially affecting BMD were also investigated including: physical activity, sun exposure, vitamin D intake. Whenever the presence of vitamin D deficiency was recorded, cholecalciferol supplementation was started and z-score data obtained at Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) during supplementation were compared with previous ones. NF1 patients showed lower Z-scores at Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry DXA than controls. Physical activity was significantly reduced in NF1 patients than in controls. Sun exposure was significantly lower in NF1 compared to control subjects. At linear regression analysis vitamin D was the most predictive factor of reduced z-score at DXA (p = 0.0001). Cholecalciferol supplementation significantly increased BMD z-score (p < 0.001). We speculated that a combination of different factors, including reduced sun exposure, possibly associated with reduced serum vitamin D levels, and poor physical activity, concur to the impaired bone status in NF1 patients. We also demonstrated that treatment with vitamin D can be effective in improving z-score value in NF1 patients, including children. In conclusion, the findings of the current study are expected to have important implications for the follow-up and prevention of osteopenia/osteoporosis in this common genetic disease.

Bone metabolism in patients with type 1 neurofibromatosis: key role of sun exposure and physical activity

Rosano C.;Assunto A.;Rossi A.;Simeoli C.;Di Salvio D.;Pivonello R.;Strisciuglio P.;Melis D.
2022

Abstract

Bone metabolism has been rarely investigated in children affected by Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Aim of the present study was to assess bone mineral metabolism in children and adults NF1 patients, to determine the relevant factors potentially involved in the development of reduced bone mineral density (BMD), and provide possible therapeutic intervention in NF1 patients. 114 NF1 patients and sex and age matched controls were enrolled into the study. Clinical and biochemical factors reflecting bone metabolism were evaluated. Factors potentially affecting BMD were also investigated including: physical activity, sun exposure, vitamin D intake. Whenever the presence of vitamin D deficiency was recorded, cholecalciferol supplementation was started and z-score data obtained at Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) during supplementation were compared with previous ones. NF1 patients showed lower Z-scores at Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry DXA than controls. Physical activity was significantly reduced in NF1 patients than in controls. Sun exposure was significantly lower in NF1 compared to control subjects. At linear regression analysis vitamin D was the most predictive factor of reduced z-score at DXA (p = 0.0001). Cholecalciferol supplementation significantly increased BMD z-score (p < 0.001). We speculated that a combination of different factors, including reduced sun exposure, possibly associated with reduced serum vitamin D levels, and poor physical activity, concur to the impaired bone status in NF1 patients. We also demonstrated that treatment with vitamin D can be effective in improving z-score value in NF1 patients, including children. In conclusion, the findings of the current study are expected to have important implications for the follow-up and prevention of osteopenia/osteoporosis in this common genetic disease.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/879995
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