If research has focused on the effect of experiences within the family and young adult outcomes, only a few studies have specifically investigated the link between within-family experiences, especially with siblings, and adult romantic relationships. Hypothesizing that siblings may fulfill attachment function in adulthood, the authors examine associations between the Lifespan Sibling Relationship Scale (LSRS; Riggio, 2000; Sommantico et al., 2017), the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R; Fraley et al., 2000; Picardi et al., 2000), and the Romance Qualities Scale (RQS; Ponti et al., 2010) in a sample of 350 students recruited from the University of Naples (68.6% females, 31.4% males; ages 19-30 yr., M = 23.6, SD = 3.2). The authors tested the hypotheses that the perception of sibling relationships and adult attachment styles were positively correlated with romantic relationship quality, and that attitudes toward sibling relationships and adult attachment styles could predict young adults’ romantic relationships’ quality. The following statistical analyses were conducted: correlations, ANOVA and two way ANOVA (to investigate group differences), and hierarchical multiple regression. Findings supported the hypotheses, in particular indicating that age, gender, attitudes toward sibling relationships and adult attachment styles combined accounted for 17.7% of the variance in relationship quality, also indicating that attitudes towards sibling relationships (β = .236; R2 = .049, p < .001), as well as adult attachment styles (β = -.347; R2 = .163, p < .001), predict the quality of young adults’ romantic relationships. Our data indicate that sibling ties and adult attachment styles may play an important role in adult couple relationship satisfaction. Results indicate and confirm the importance of focusing on attachment processes as a way to contribute to build security for individuals and couples in counseling and in therapy.

ATTITUDES TOWARD SIBLING RELATIONSHIPS AND ADULT ATTACHMENT STYLES PREDICTING YOUNG ADULTS’ ROMANTIC TIES

Sommantico, M.;Donizzetti, A. R.;De Rosa, B.;Parrello, S.
2018

Abstract

If research has focused on the effect of experiences within the family and young adult outcomes, only a few studies have specifically investigated the link between within-family experiences, especially with siblings, and adult romantic relationships. Hypothesizing that siblings may fulfill attachment function in adulthood, the authors examine associations between the Lifespan Sibling Relationship Scale (LSRS; Riggio, 2000; Sommantico et al., 2017), the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R; Fraley et al., 2000; Picardi et al., 2000), and the Romance Qualities Scale (RQS; Ponti et al., 2010) in a sample of 350 students recruited from the University of Naples (68.6% females, 31.4% males; ages 19-30 yr., M = 23.6, SD = 3.2). The authors tested the hypotheses that the perception of sibling relationships and adult attachment styles were positively correlated with romantic relationship quality, and that attitudes toward sibling relationships and adult attachment styles could predict young adults’ romantic relationships’ quality. The following statistical analyses were conducted: correlations, ANOVA and two way ANOVA (to investigate group differences), and hierarchical multiple regression. Findings supported the hypotheses, in particular indicating that age, gender, attitudes toward sibling relationships and adult attachment styles combined accounted for 17.7% of the variance in relationship quality, also indicating that attitudes towards sibling relationships (β = .236; R2 = .049, p < .001), as well as adult attachment styles (β = -.347; R2 = .163, p < .001), predict the quality of young adults’ romantic relationships. Our data indicate that sibling ties and adult attachment styles may play an important role in adult couple relationship satisfaction. Results indicate and confirm the importance of focusing on attachment processes as a way to contribute to build security for individuals and couples in counseling and in therapy.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/721084
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact