In recent years, plastic pollution has become a growing environmental concern: more than 350 million tons of plastic material are produced annually. Although many efforts have been made to recycle waste, a significant proportion of these plastics contaminate and accumulate in the environment. A central point in plastic pollution is demonstrated by the evidence that plastic objects gradually and continuously split up into smaller pieces, thus producing subtle and invisible pollution caused by microplastics (MP) and nanoplastics (NP). The small dimensions of these particles allow for the diffusion of these contaminants in farmlands, forest, freshwater, and oceans worldwide, posing serious menaces to human, animal, and plant health. The uptake of MPs and NPs into plant cells seriously affects plant growth, development, and photosynthesis, finally limiting crop yields and endangering natural environmental biodiversity. Furthermore, nano- and microplastics—once adsorbed by plants—can easily enter the food chain, being highly toxic to animals and humans. This review addresses the impacts of MP and NP particles on plants in the terrestrial environment. In particular, we provide an overview here of the detrimental effects of photosynthetic injuries, oxidative stress, ROS production, and protein damage triggered by MN and NP in higher plants and, more specifically, in crops. The possible damage at the physiological and environmental levels is discussed.

Plastic in the Environment: A Modern Type of Abiotic Stress for Plant Physiology / Santini, Giorgia; Castiglia, Daniela; Perrotta, MARYANNA MARTINA; Landi, Simone; Maisto, Giulia; Esposito, Sergio. - In: PLANTS. - ISSN 2223-7747. - 12:21(2023), p. 3717. [10.3390/plants12213717]

Plastic in the Environment: A Modern Type of Abiotic Stress for Plant Physiology

Giorgia Santini
Co-primo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Daniela Castiglia
Co-primo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Maryanna Martina Perrotta
Co-primo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Simone Landi
Secondo
Conceptualization
;
Giulia Maisto
Penultimo
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Sergio Esposito
Ultimo
Supervision
2023

Abstract

In recent years, plastic pollution has become a growing environmental concern: more than 350 million tons of plastic material are produced annually. Although many efforts have been made to recycle waste, a significant proportion of these plastics contaminate and accumulate in the environment. A central point in plastic pollution is demonstrated by the evidence that plastic objects gradually and continuously split up into smaller pieces, thus producing subtle and invisible pollution caused by microplastics (MP) and nanoplastics (NP). The small dimensions of these particles allow for the diffusion of these contaminants in farmlands, forest, freshwater, and oceans worldwide, posing serious menaces to human, animal, and plant health. The uptake of MPs and NPs into plant cells seriously affects plant growth, development, and photosynthesis, finally limiting crop yields and endangering natural environmental biodiversity. Furthermore, nano- and microplastics—once adsorbed by plants—can easily enter the food chain, being highly toxic to animals and humans. This review addresses the impacts of MP and NP particles on plants in the terrestrial environment. In particular, we provide an overview here of the detrimental effects of photosynthetic injuries, oxidative stress, ROS production, and protein damage triggered by MN and NP in higher plants and, more specifically, in crops. The possible damage at the physiological and environmental levels is discussed.
2023
Plastic in the Environment: A Modern Type of Abiotic Stress for Plant Physiology / Santini, Giorgia; Castiglia, Daniela; Perrotta, MARYANNA MARTINA; Landi, Simone; Maisto, Giulia; Esposito, Sergio. - In: PLANTS. - ISSN 2223-7747. - 12:21(2023), p. 3717. [10.3390/plants12213717]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/944443
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