In persons with congenital severe hemophilia A (HA) living in high-income countries, twice weekly intravenous infusions of extended half-life (EHL) factor VIII (FVIII) products, or weekly/biweekly/monthly subcutaneous injections of emicizumab are the gold standard home treatments to grant days without hurdles and limitations. Once weekly/twice monthly infusions of EHL Factor IX (FIX) products achieve the same target in severe hemophilia B (HB). Gene therapy, which is likely to be licensed for clinical use within 1-2 years, embodies a shift beyond these standards. At an individual patient level, a single functional gene transfer leads to a > 10-yr almost full correction of the hemostatic defect in HB and to a sustained (3-6-yrs) expression of FVIII sufficient to discontinue exogenous clotting factor administrations. At the doses employed, the limited liver toxicity of systemically infused recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors is documented by long-term (12-15 yrs) follow-ups, and pre-existing high-titer neutralizing antibodies to the AAV5 vector are no longer an exclusion criterion for effective transgene expression with this vector. A safe durable treatment that converts a challenging illness to a phenotypically curable disease, allows persons to feel virtually free from the fears and the obligations of hemophilia for years/decades. Along with patient organizations and health care professionals, communicating to government authorities and reimbursement agencies the liberating potential of this substantial innovation, and disseminating across the Centers updated information on benefits and risks of this strategy, will align expectations of different stakeholders and establish the notion of a potentially lifelong cure of hemophilia.

Progress, and prospects in the therapeutic armamentarium of persons with congenital hemophilia. Defining the place for liver-directed gene therapy

Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola;Pastore, Lucio;Castaldo, Giuseppe;Di Minno, Matteo
2022

Abstract

In persons with congenital severe hemophilia A (HA) living in high-income countries, twice weekly intravenous infusions of extended half-life (EHL) factor VIII (FVIII) products, or weekly/biweekly/monthly subcutaneous injections of emicizumab are the gold standard home treatments to grant days without hurdles and limitations. Once weekly/twice monthly infusions of EHL Factor IX (FIX) products achieve the same target in severe hemophilia B (HB). Gene therapy, which is likely to be licensed for clinical use within 1-2 years, embodies a shift beyond these standards. At an individual patient level, a single functional gene transfer leads to a > 10-yr almost full correction of the hemostatic defect in HB and to a sustained (3-6-yrs) expression of FVIII sufficient to discontinue exogenous clotting factor administrations. At the doses employed, the limited liver toxicity of systemically infused recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors is documented by long-term (12-15 yrs) follow-ups, and pre-existing high-titer neutralizing antibodies to the AAV5 vector are no longer an exclusion criterion for effective transgene expression with this vector. A safe durable treatment that converts a challenging illness to a phenotypically curable disease, allows persons to feel virtually free from the fears and the obligations of hemophilia for years/decades. Along with patient organizations and health care professionals, communicating to government authorities and reimbursement agencies the liberating potential of this substantial innovation, and disseminating across the Centers updated information on benefits and risks of this strategy, will align expectations of different stakeholders and establish the notion of a potentially lifelong cure of hemophilia.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/892753
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