Media-generated narratives/images of the world are used to construct meaning about political and social issues. The lens through which we receive these words and images is not neutral but evinces the power and point of view of the political and economic elites who operate behind the media. As aptly put by George Orwell in 1946, “(political) language is designed to make lies sound truthful and […] to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind”. The special genius of this system is to make the whole process seem so normal and natural that the very art of social construction is invisible. However, the overarching meaning potential of media language can become particularly dangerous when the well-being of people(s) is at stake. Moving from the present spreading of the coronavirus back to press coverage of the H1N1 virus in UK tabloids, I investigate specialised media discourse and its textual strategies. More precisely, in the case of the H1N1 virus, I will demonstrate how such strategies enable(d) the press to convey a biased representation of (c)overt beliefs rather than impersonal data and facts.

«…an appearance of solidity to pure wind» – Unveiling media language

Cavaliere, Flavia
2020

Abstract

Media-generated narratives/images of the world are used to construct meaning about political and social issues. The lens through which we receive these words and images is not neutral but evinces the power and point of view of the political and economic elites who operate behind the media. As aptly put by George Orwell in 1946, “(political) language is designed to make lies sound truthful and […] to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind”. The special genius of this system is to make the whole process seem so normal and natural that the very art of social construction is invisible. However, the overarching meaning potential of media language can become particularly dangerous when the well-being of people(s) is at stake. Moving from the present spreading of the coronavirus back to press coverage of the H1N1 virus in UK tabloids, I investigate specialised media discourse and its textual strategies. More precisely, in the case of the H1N1 virus, I will demonstrate how such strategies enable(d) the press to convey a biased representation of (c)overt beliefs rather than impersonal data and facts.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/827400
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