Many pathogens involved in human infection have rapidly increased their antibiotic resistance, reducing the effectiveness of therapies in recent decades. Most of them can form biofilms and effective drugs are not available to treat these formations. Natural products could represent an efficient solution in discovering and developing new drugs to overcome antimicrobial resistance and treat biofilm-related infections. In this study, 20 secondary metabolites produced by pathogenic fungi of forest plants and belonging to diverse classes of naturally occurring compounds were evaluated for the first time against clinical isolates of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. epi-Epoformin, sphaeropsidone, and sphaeropsidin A showed antimicrobial activity on all test strains. In particular, sphaeropsidin A was effective at low concentrations with Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values ranging from 6.25 μg/mL to 12.5 μg/mL against all reference and clinical test strains. Furthermore, sphaeropsidin A at sub-inhibitory concentrations decreased methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, as quantified by crystal violet staining. Interestingly, mixtures of sphaeropsidin A and epi-epoformin have shown antimicrobial synergistic effects with a concomitant reduction of cytotoxicity against human immortalized keratinocytes. Our data show that sphaeropsidin A and epi-epoformin possess promising antimicrobial properties.

Anti-Biofilm Activity of the Fungal Phytotoxin Sphaeropsidin A Against Clinical Isolates of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Roscetto, Emanuela
;
Masi, Marco;Esposito, Matilde;Di Lecce, Roberta Di;Delicato, Antonella;Calabrò, Viola;Evidente, Antonio;Catania, Maria Rosaria
2020

Abstract

Many pathogens involved in human infection have rapidly increased their antibiotic resistance, reducing the effectiveness of therapies in recent decades. Most of them can form biofilms and effective drugs are not available to treat these formations. Natural products could represent an efficient solution in discovering and developing new drugs to overcome antimicrobial resistance and treat biofilm-related infections. In this study, 20 secondary metabolites produced by pathogenic fungi of forest plants and belonging to diverse classes of naturally occurring compounds were evaluated for the first time against clinical isolates of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. epi-Epoformin, sphaeropsidone, and sphaeropsidin A showed antimicrobial activity on all test strains. In particular, sphaeropsidin A was effective at low concentrations with Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values ranging from 6.25 μg/mL to 12.5 μg/mL against all reference and clinical test strains. Furthermore, sphaeropsidin A at sub-inhibitory concentrations decreased methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, as quantified by crystal violet staining. Interestingly, mixtures of sphaeropsidin A and epi-epoformin have shown antimicrobial synergistic effects with a concomitant reduction of cytotoxicity against human immortalized keratinocytes. Our data show that sphaeropsidin A and epi-epoformin possess promising antimicrobial properties.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/813549
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