Archaeological excavations performed in a funerary complex in Cuma (Campania region, Italy) unearthed excellently preserved common wares dated to the third century A.D. Archaeometric analyses were focused on Campanian pitchers, Aegean like cooking pots, and pyriform pitchers, the latter recorded for the first time in an Italian context. The local pitchers were manufactured with a high‐CaO clay (CaO = ca. 12 wt.%) and local volcanic temper, fired at ca. 800–850°C, as suggested by the presence of calcite. The Aegean‐like pots and the pyriform pitchers were made with low‐CaO clay (CaO ≤ 4.0 wt.%) mixed with a calcite‐bearing temper, along with volcanic and siliciclastic grains, and fired at 800–950°C. The comparison with raw materials inferred that local vessels were made with low‐CaO basinal clays which outcrop in the northern Campania region, and sands from the shoreline north of Cuma where carbonate, siliciclastic and volcanic phases mix together. Our results suggest that the Phlegraean Late Roman workshops produced their traditional vases along with imitations of Aegean‐like pottery. Thus, microregional production responded to a market demand requiring shapes and styles similar to imports from the eastern Mediterranean, with which commercial trade was still quite active.

Local production and imitations of Late Roman pottery from a well in the Roman necropolis of Cuma in Naples, Italy

De Bonis, Alberto;Izzo, Francesco;Langella, Alessio;Mercurio, Mariano;Morra, Vincenzo;Grifa, Celestino
2019

Abstract

Archaeological excavations performed in a funerary complex in Cuma (Campania region, Italy) unearthed excellently preserved common wares dated to the third century A.D. Archaeometric analyses were focused on Campanian pitchers, Aegean like cooking pots, and pyriform pitchers, the latter recorded for the first time in an Italian context. The local pitchers were manufactured with a high‐CaO clay (CaO = ca. 12 wt.%) and local volcanic temper, fired at ca. 800–850°C, as suggested by the presence of calcite. The Aegean‐like pots and the pyriform pitchers were made with low‐CaO clay (CaO ≤ 4.0 wt.%) mixed with a calcite‐bearing temper, along with volcanic and siliciclastic grains, and fired at 800–950°C. The comparison with raw materials inferred that local vessels were made with low‐CaO basinal clays which outcrop in the northern Campania region, and sands from the shoreline north of Cuma where carbonate, siliciclastic and volcanic phases mix together. Our results suggest that the Phlegraean Late Roman workshops produced their traditional vases along with imitations of Aegean‐like pottery. Thus, microregional production responded to a market demand requiring shapes and styles similar to imports from the eastern Mediterranean, with which commercial trade was still quite active.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/737107
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