A continuous flow micro-reactor irradiated by UV-LEDs was employed to treat coloured wastewater by adsorption and simultaneous photocatalysis. Zinc oxide (ZnO) immobilized on commercial zeolites pellets in spherical shape (ZEO) was used as catalytic material in a micro-reactor maximizing the photocatalyst exposition to light sources, irradiating uniformly the entire solution volume and improving the mass transfer phenomena. Experimental tests were carried out on crystal violet dye (CV) as one of the main dying agent present in textile wastewater. The comparison between adsorption and adsorption/photocatalytic tests showed that UV irradiation can achieve a steady state CV concentration value corresponding to an equilibrium condition between adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation. The higher removal efficiency (i.e. 93%) was observed with a liquid flow rate of 1.1 mL/min (contact time = 4.7 min; CV = 10 mg/L) under UV light irradiation. In the steady state, CV removal remained constant for the overall testing time. Bioassays evidenced that toxicity was not completely removed (i.e. final effluent ranked as “slight acute toxic”) from wastewater suggesting its suitability for sewage collection discharge. A Dubinin Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm model was applied for studying the adsorption behaviour of ZnO/ZEO sample. CV adsorption constants were evaluated from experimental data carried out in dark conditions in a batch system. Kinetic expression of CV removal and the D-R adsorption were incorporated in the CV mass balance estimating the kinetic parameter. The model was validated comparing the calculated CV conversion with the experimental tests collected at different CV inlet concentration.

Crystal violet and toxicity removal by adsorption and simultaneous photocatalysis in a continuous flow micro-reactor

Libralato, Giovanni;Guida, Marco;Lofrano, Giusy;
2018

Abstract

A continuous flow micro-reactor irradiated by UV-LEDs was employed to treat coloured wastewater by adsorption and simultaneous photocatalysis. Zinc oxide (ZnO) immobilized on commercial zeolites pellets in spherical shape (ZEO) was used as catalytic material in a micro-reactor maximizing the photocatalyst exposition to light sources, irradiating uniformly the entire solution volume and improving the mass transfer phenomena. Experimental tests were carried out on crystal violet dye (CV) as one of the main dying agent present in textile wastewater. The comparison between adsorption and adsorption/photocatalytic tests showed that UV irradiation can achieve a steady state CV concentration value corresponding to an equilibrium condition between adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation. The higher removal efficiency (i.e. 93%) was observed with a liquid flow rate of 1.1 mL/min (contact time = 4.7 min; CV = 10 mg/L) under UV light irradiation. In the steady state, CV removal remained constant for the overall testing time. Bioassays evidenced that toxicity was not completely removed (i.e. final effluent ranked as “slight acute toxic”) from wastewater suggesting its suitability for sewage collection discharge. A Dubinin Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm model was applied for studying the adsorption behaviour of ZnO/ZEO sample. CV adsorption constants were evaluated from experimental data carried out in dark conditions in a batch system. Kinetic expression of CV removal and the D-R adsorption were incorporated in the CV mass balance estimating the kinetic parameter. The model was validated comparing the calculated CV conversion with the experimental tests collected at different CV inlet concentration.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/719824
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