A huge proportion of antibiotic therapies for infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR) are inappropriate. In this study, we described the most common causes of inappropriateness of definitive antibiotic regimes in a large university hospital in southern Italy and we evaluated the impact on microbial eradication, length of stay, 30-day readmission and mortality. We retrospectively assessed 45 patients who received a definitive antibiotic therapy after isolation of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. strains between 2014 and 2015. From the literature, we set a series of criteria to retrospectively determine the appropriateness of the therapy. In all, 61% of the prescribed antibiotic regimes were found to be inappropriate, especially due to incorrect drug dosage. It emerged that meropenem was the antibiotic most frequently inappropriately used. In 46% of infections caused by MDR but not extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenems were inappropriately administered. Microbial eradication was achieved in 87% of the appropriate therapy group compared to 31% of the inappropriate therapy group (chi-square=6.750, p<0.027). No statistically significant association was found between inappropriate therapy and the length of stay (chi-square=3.084, p=0.101) and 30-day readmission (p=0.103). Definitive antibiotic therapy in infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria in a large university hospital is often inappropriate, especially due to the drug dosing regimen, particularly in the case of meropenem and colistin. This inappropriateness has a significant impact on post-treatment microbial eradication in specimens collected after antibiotic therapy.

Appropriateness of antibiotic prescription for targeted therapy of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria: Assessment of the most common improper uses in a tertiary hospital in Southern Italy

VICECONTE, GIULIO
;
Maraolo, Alberto Enrico;Iula, Vita Dora;Catania, Maria Rosaria;Tosone, Grazia;Orlando, Raffaele
2017

Abstract

A huge proportion of antibiotic therapies for infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR) are inappropriate. In this study, we described the most common causes of inappropriateness of definitive antibiotic regimes in a large university hospital in southern Italy and we evaluated the impact on microbial eradication, length of stay, 30-day readmission and mortality. We retrospectively assessed 45 patients who received a definitive antibiotic therapy after isolation of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. strains between 2014 and 2015. From the literature, we set a series of criteria to retrospectively determine the appropriateness of the therapy. In all, 61% of the prescribed antibiotic regimes were found to be inappropriate, especially due to incorrect drug dosage. It emerged that meropenem was the antibiotic most frequently inappropriately used. In 46% of infections caused by MDR but not extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenems were inappropriately administered. Microbial eradication was achieved in 87% of the appropriate therapy group compared to 31% of the inappropriate therapy group (chi-square=6.750, p<0.027). No statistically significant association was found between inappropriate therapy and the length of stay (chi-square=3.084, p=0.101) and 30-day readmission (p=0.103). Definitive antibiotic therapy in infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria in a large university hospital is often inappropriate, especially due to the drug dosing regimen, particularly in the case of meropenem and colistin. This inappropriateness has a significant impact on post-treatment microbial eradication in specimens collected after antibiotic therapy.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/702961
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