What remains of Croce today? The "Lessico crociano" presented here moves from this question. The editorial project began in 2013, when some of the most authoritative Italian and foreign scholars and a new generation of Croce's interpreters were invited by the editor to draw up a small essential conceptual "lexicon" of Croce's thought. And so the "voices" that can be read here have taken shape, ranging from art to politics, from logic to history, bearing witness to the variegated and complex intellectual physiognomy of the thinker who more and better than others has represented the spirit of Italian philosophy in the twentieth century, even beyond national borders. Having overcome the ideological season that saw the "liquidators" and the "defenders" of Croce's thought lined up on two opposite sides, and having verified the inadequacy of a "monumental" and "antiquarian" historiography applied to the still living flesh of Croce's legacy of thought, the time is propitious to finally read Croce in a positively "barbaric" way, that is, as children of no school and with new eyes. And to verify, consequently, not the banal prophetic topicality or the irredeemable inactuality of the contents, but the beneficial vitality of a methodological framework and, in general, of an authentically cosmopolitan approach to the questions of the world. For this reason, to the specialist as well as to the simple curious reader of Croce, a "breviary" is offered in synthesis: some propaedeutic and lay notes recovered from a still living past, so that they can serve the men of the present to "foresee" with thought the otherwise unrepresentable scenarios of action in the future. The entry "Baroque" takes its cue from Croce's 1929 book "Storia dell'età barocca in Italia" (History of the Baroque Age in Italy) and discusses its genesis, its connections with other works and the overall judgment on what is defined as a relative "age of decadence". The author has already devoted to the Barock-Reinassance of the 1920s the article "Of some Croce's motifs in Benjamin" ("Bollettino filosofico", 2013), reading Croce's work with Benjamin's "Origin of Baroque Drama".

Barocco

PELUSO, ROSALIA
2016

Abstract

What remains of Croce today? The "Lessico crociano" presented here moves from this question. The editorial project began in 2013, when some of the most authoritative Italian and foreign scholars and a new generation of Croce's interpreters were invited by the editor to draw up a small essential conceptual "lexicon" of Croce's thought. And so the "voices" that can be read here have taken shape, ranging from art to politics, from logic to history, bearing witness to the variegated and complex intellectual physiognomy of the thinker who more and better than others has represented the spirit of Italian philosophy in the twentieth century, even beyond national borders. Having overcome the ideological season that saw the "liquidators" and the "defenders" of Croce's thought lined up on two opposite sides, and having verified the inadequacy of a "monumental" and "antiquarian" historiography applied to the still living flesh of Croce's legacy of thought, the time is propitious to finally read Croce in a positively "barbaric" way, that is, as children of no school and with new eyes. And to verify, consequently, not the banal prophetic topicality or the irredeemable inactuality of the contents, but the beneficial vitality of a methodological framework and, in general, of an authentically cosmopolitan approach to the questions of the world. For this reason, to the specialist as well as to the simple curious reader of Croce, a "breviary" is offered in synthesis: some propaedeutic and lay notes recovered from a still living past, so that they can serve the men of the present to "foresee" with thought the otherwise unrepresentable scenarios of action in the future. The entry "Baroque" takes its cue from Croce's 1929 book "Storia dell'età barocca in Italia" (History of the Baroque Age in Italy) and discusses its genesis, its connections with other works and the overall judgment on what is defined as a relative "age of decadence". The author has already devoted to the Barock-Reinassance of the 1920s the article "Of some Croce's motifs in Benjamin" ("Bollettino filosofico", 2013), reading Croce's work with Benjamin's "Origin of Baroque Drama".
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/671015
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