Relapses or flares of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are frequent and observed in 27-66% of patients. SLE flares are defined as an increase in disease activity, in general, requiring alternative treatment or intensification of therapy. A renal flare is indicated by an increase in proteinuria and/or serum creatinine concentration, abnormal urine sediment or a reduction in creatinine clearance rate as a result of active disease. The morbidity associated with renal flares is derived from both the kidney damage due to lupus nephritis and treatment-related toxic effects. Current induction treatment protocols achieve remission in the majority of patients with lupus nephritis; however, few studies focus on treatment interventions for renal flares in these patients. In the United States, approximately 35% of adults with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) have clinical evidence of nephritis at the time of diagnosis; with an estimated total of 50–60% developing nephritis during the first 10 years of disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) last published guidelines for management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 1999. That publication was designed primarily for education of primary care physicians and recommended therapeutic and management approaches for many manifestations of SLE. Here, we will examine the approach to follow during renal Involvement in young patients affected by SLE and the importance to agree to the American College of Rheumatology’s recommendations for s creening, treatment, and management of Lupus Nephritis.

Renal Involvement in a Young Male affected by SLE: adherence to the Guidelines for Screening, Treatment, and Management of Lupus Nephritis?

ROSSI, FRANCESCA WANDA;DE PAULIS, AMATO;G. Marone
2014

Abstract

Relapses or flares of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are frequent and observed in 27-66% of patients. SLE flares are defined as an increase in disease activity, in general, requiring alternative treatment or intensification of therapy. A renal flare is indicated by an increase in proteinuria and/or serum creatinine concentration, abnormal urine sediment or a reduction in creatinine clearance rate as a result of active disease. The morbidity associated with renal flares is derived from both the kidney damage due to lupus nephritis and treatment-related toxic effects. Current induction treatment protocols achieve remission in the majority of patients with lupus nephritis; however, few studies focus on treatment interventions for renal flares in these patients. In the United States, approximately 35% of adults with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) have clinical evidence of nephritis at the time of diagnosis; with an estimated total of 50–60% developing nephritis during the first 10 years of disease. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) last published guidelines for management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 1999. That publication was designed primarily for education of primary care physicians and recommended therapeutic and management approaches for many manifestations of SLE. Here, we will examine the approach to follow during renal Involvement in young patients affected by SLE and the importance to agree to the American College of Rheumatology’s recommendations for s creening, treatment, and management of Lupus Nephritis.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/593837
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