Fatty liver accumulation, inflammatory process and insulin resistance appear to be crucial in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), nevertheless emerging findings pointed an important role also for iron overload. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanisms of hepatic iron metabolism in the onset of steatosis to understand whether its impairment could be an early event of liver inflammatory injury. Rats were fed with control diet or high fat diet (HFD) for 5 or 8 weeks, after which liver morphology, serum lipid profile, transaminases levels and hepatic iron content (HIC), were evaluated. In liver of HFD fed animals an increased time-dependent activity of iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) was evidenced, associated with the increase in transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1) expression and ferritin down-regulation. Moreover, ferroportin (FPN-1), the main protein involved in iron export, was down-regulated accordingly with hepcidin increase. These findings were indicative of an increased iron content into hepatocytes, which leads to an increase of harmful free-iron also related to the reduction of hepatic ferritin content. The progressive inflammatory damage was evidenced by the increase of hepatic TNF-a, IL-6 and leptin, in parallel to increased iron content and oxidative stress. The major finding that emerged of this study is the impairment of iron homeostasis in the ongoing and sustaining of liver steatosis, suggesting a strong link between iron metabolism unbalance, inflammatory damage and progression of disease.

High Fat Diet Induces Liver Steatosis and Early Dysregulation of Iron Metabolism in Rats / Meli, Rosaria; MATTACE RASO, Giuseppina; Irace, Carlo; Simeoli, Raffaele; Antonio Di, Pascale; Paciello, Orlando; Teresa Bruna, Pagano; Calignano, Antonio; Colonna, Alfredo; Santamaria, Rita. - In: PLOS ONE. - ISSN 1932-6203. - 8:6(2013), pp. e66570-e66570. [10.1371/journal.pone.0066570]

High Fat Diet Induces Liver Steatosis and Early Dysregulation of Iron Metabolism in Rats

MELI, ROSARIA;MATTACE RASO, GIUSEPPINA;IRACE, CARLO;SIMEOLI, RAFFAELE;PACIELLO, ORLANDO;CALIGNANO, ANTONIO;COLONNA, ALFREDO;SANTAMARIA, RITA
2013

Abstract

Fatty liver accumulation, inflammatory process and insulin resistance appear to be crucial in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), nevertheless emerging findings pointed an important role also for iron overload. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanisms of hepatic iron metabolism in the onset of steatosis to understand whether its impairment could be an early event of liver inflammatory injury. Rats were fed with control diet or high fat diet (HFD) for 5 or 8 weeks, after which liver morphology, serum lipid profile, transaminases levels and hepatic iron content (HIC), were evaluated. In liver of HFD fed animals an increased time-dependent activity of iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) was evidenced, associated with the increase in transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1) expression and ferritin down-regulation. Moreover, ferroportin (FPN-1), the main protein involved in iron export, was down-regulated accordingly with hepcidin increase. These findings were indicative of an increased iron content into hepatocytes, which leads to an increase of harmful free-iron also related to the reduction of hepatic ferritin content. The progressive inflammatory damage was evidenced by the increase of hepatic TNF-a, IL-6 and leptin, in parallel to increased iron content and oxidative stress. The major finding that emerged of this study is the impairment of iron homeostasis in the ongoing and sustaining of liver steatosis, suggesting a strong link between iron metabolism unbalance, inflammatory damage and progression of disease.
2013
High Fat Diet Induces Liver Steatosis and Early Dysregulation of Iron Metabolism in Rats / Meli, Rosaria; MATTACE RASO, Giuseppina; Irace, Carlo; Simeoli, Raffaele; Antonio Di, Pascale; Paciello, Orlando; Teresa Bruna, Pagano; Calignano, Antonio; Colonna, Alfredo; Santamaria, Rita. - In: PLOS ONE. - ISSN 1932-6203. - 8:6(2013), pp. e66570-e66570. [10.1371/journal.pone.0066570]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/556459
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 88
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 79
social impact