The next round of EU enlargement, due to take place in May 2004, not only constitutes a major event in the building of a future European landscape, but certainly has enormous repercussions on the continent’s geopolitical prospect and its relations with neighbouring countries. The conclusions of European Councils represent an interesting snapshot of the “state of the art” in Europe. The texts are often the result of an intensive and delicate preparatory work that paves the way for the final decision-making process in Europe. This paper investigates the frequent aspects of vagueness and political compromise reached through the strategic use of all-inclusive linguistic constructions. The reasons that justify the use of a “diplomatic” language are also presented in the light of the current political relations existing between the EU and the acceding countries. Special attention is devoted to the particular case of Turkey. The country is a NATO member and enjoys a powerful and crucial position on Europe’s map. However, in spite of an EC Association agreement signed as early as 1963 and a candidature presented in 1987 (well before all the other states now joining), Turkey is the only country still to open negotiations with the EU. The attitude towards this country has always been particularly ambiguous and has witnessed numerous changes over the years. In this respect, the diachronic study of the language employed is carried out through a comparative analysis of different Council conclusions’ texts (from Copenhagen 1993 to Athens 2003).

EU Discourse on Enlargement: the Negotiation of Meaning

CALIENDO, GIUDITTA;VENUTI, MARCO
2008

Abstract

The next round of EU enlargement, due to take place in May 2004, not only constitutes a major event in the building of a future European landscape, but certainly has enormous repercussions on the continent’s geopolitical prospect and its relations with neighbouring countries. The conclusions of European Councils represent an interesting snapshot of the “state of the art” in Europe. The texts are often the result of an intensive and delicate preparatory work that paves the way for the final decision-making process in Europe. This paper investigates the frequent aspects of vagueness and political compromise reached through the strategic use of all-inclusive linguistic constructions. The reasons that justify the use of a “diplomatic” language are also presented in the light of the current political relations existing between the EU and the acceding countries. Special attention is devoted to the particular case of Turkey. The country is a NATO member and enjoys a powerful and crucial position on Europe’s map. However, in spite of an EC Association agreement signed as early as 1963 and a candidature presented in 1987 (well before all the other states now joining), Turkey is the only country still to open negotiations with the EU. The attitude towards this country has always been particularly ambiguous and has witnessed numerous changes over the years. In this respect, the diachronic study of the language employed is carried out through a comparative analysis of different Council conclusions’ texts (from Copenhagen 1993 to Athens 2003).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/380750
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