: Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit resulting from androgen-induced increased sebum production, altered keratinization, inflammation, and bacterial colonization of the hair follicles of the face, neck, chest and back by Propionibacterium acnes. Overall, inflammation and immune responses are strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of acne. Although early colonization with Propionibacterium acnes and family history may play an important role in the disease, it remains unclear exactly what triggers acne and how treatment affects disease progression. The influence of diet on acne disease is a growing research topic, yet few studies have examined the effects of diet on the development and clinical severity of acne disease, and the results have often been contradictory. Interestingly, very low-calorie ketogenic diet (VLCKD) has been associated with both significant reductions in body weight and inflammatory status through the production of ketone bodies and thus it has been expected to reduce the exacerbation of clinical manifestations or even block the trigger of acne disease. Given the paucity of studies regarding the implementation of VLCKD in the management of acne, this review aims to provide evidence from the available scientific literature to support the speculative use of VLCKD in the treatment of acne.

The effect of the ketogenic diet on Acne: Could it be a therapeutic tool? / Barrea, Luigi; Cacciapuoti, Sara; Megna, Matteo; Verde, Ludovica; Marasca, Claudio; Vono, Rosa; Camajani, Elisabetta; Colao, Annamaria; Savastano, Silvia; Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Muscogiuri, Giovanna. - In: CRITICAL REVIEWS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND NUTRITION. - ISSN 1040-8398. - (2023), pp. 1-20. [10.1080/10408398.2023.2176813]

The effect of the ketogenic diet on Acne: Could it be a therapeutic tool?

Barrea, Luigi
;
Cacciapuoti, Sara;Megna, Matteo;Verde, Ludovica;Marasca, Claudio;Colao, Annamaria;Savastano, Silvia;Fabbrocini, Gabriella;Muscogiuri, Giovanna
2023

Abstract

: Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit resulting from androgen-induced increased sebum production, altered keratinization, inflammation, and bacterial colonization of the hair follicles of the face, neck, chest and back by Propionibacterium acnes. Overall, inflammation and immune responses are strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of acne. Although early colonization with Propionibacterium acnes and family history may play an important role in the disease, it remains unclear exactly what triggers acne and how treatment affects disease progression. The influence of diet on acne disease is a growing research topic, yet few studies have examined the effects of diet on the development and clinical severity of acne disease, and the results have often been contradictory. Interestingly, very low-calorie ketogenic diet (VLCKD) has been associated with both significant reductions in body weight and inflammatory status through the production of ketone bodies and thus it has been expected to reduce the exacerbation of clinical manifestations or even block the trigger of acne disease. Given the paucity of studies regarding the implementation of VLCKD in the management of acne, this review aims to provide evidence from the available scientific literature to support the speculative use of VLCKD in the treatment of acne.
2023
The effect of the ketogenic diet on Acne: Could it be a therapeutic tool? / Barrea, Luigi; Cacciapuoti, Sara; Megna, Matteo; Verde, Ludovica; Marasca, Claudio; Vono, Rosa; Camajani, Elisabetta; Colao, Annamaria; Savastano, Silvia; Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Muscogiuri, Giovanna. - In: CRITICAL REVIEWS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND NUTRITION. - ISSN 1040-8398. - (2023), pp. 1-20. [10.1080/10408398.2023.2176813]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/912170
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