BDDE (1,4-butanediol-diglycidylether)-crosslinked hyaluronan (HA) hydrogels are widely used for dermo-aesthetic purposes. The rheology and stability of the gels under physiological conditions greatly affect their clinical indications and outcomes. To date, no studies investigating how these features are related to the chemistry of the polymeric network have been reported. Here, four available HA-BDDE hydrogels were studied to determine how and to what extent their rheology and stability with respect to enzymatic hydrolysis relate to the type and degree of HA structural modification.1 H-/13 C-NMR analyses were associated for the quantification of the “true” HA chemical derivatization level, discriminating between HA that was effectively crosslinked by BDDE, and branched HA with BDDE that was anchored on one side. The rheology was measured conventionally and during hydration in a physiological medium. Sensitivity to bovine testicular hyaluronidase was quantified. The correlation between NMR data and gel rheology/stability was evaluated. The study indicated that (1) the gels greatly differed in the amounts of branched, crosslinked, and overall modified HA, with most of the HA being branched; (2) unexpectedly, the conventionally measured rheological properties did not correlate with the chemical data; (3) the gels’ ranking in terms of rheology was greatly affected by hydration; (4) the rheology of the hydrated gels was quantitatively correlated with the amount of crosslinked HA, whereas the correlations with the total HA modification level and with the degree of branched HA were less significant; (5) increasing HA derivatization/crosslinking over 9/3 mol% did not enhance the stability with respect to hyaluronidases. These results broaden our knowledge of these gels and provide valuable information for improving their design and characterization.

Hyaluronan Hydrogels: Rheology and Stability in Relation to the Type/Level of Biopolymer Chemical Modification

Bedini E.;Schiraldi C.
2022

Abstract

BDDE (1,4-butanediol-diglycidylether)-crosslinked hyaluronan (HA) hydrogels are widely used for dermo-aesthetic purposes. The rheology and stability of the gels under physiological conditions greatly affect their clinical indications and outcomes. To date, no studies investigating how these features are related to the chemistry of the polymeric network have been reported. Here, four available HA-BDDE hydrogels were studied to determine how and to what extent their rheology and stability with respect to enzymatic hydrolysis relate to the type and degree of HA structural modification.1 H-/13 C-NMR analyses were associated for the quantification of the “true” HA chemical derivatization level, discriminating between HA that was effectively crosslinked by BDDE, and branched HA with BDDE that was anchored on one side. The rheology was measured conventionally and during hydration in a physiological medium. Sensitivity to bovine testicular hyaluronidase was quantified. The correlation between NMR data and gel rheology/stability was evaluated. The study indicated that (1) the gels greatly differed in the amounts of branched, crosslinked, and overall modified HA, with most of the HA being branched; (2) unexpectedly, the conventionally measured rheological properties did not correlate with the chemical data; (3) the gels’ ranking in terms of rheology was greatly affected by hydration; (4) the rheology of the hydrated gels was quantitatively correlated with the amount of crosslinked HA, whereas the correlations with the total HA modification level and with the degree of branched HA were less significant; (5) increasing HA derivatization/crosslinking over 9/3 mol% did not enhance the stability with respect to hyaluronidases. These results broaden our knowledge of these gels and provide valuable information for improving their design and characterization.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/901741
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