Objective: The development of integrated multimedia operating rooms has made possible to record surgical procedures mainly in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and robotic surgery. This modality of video storage allows the trainees to study surgical procedures based on video analysis. The aim of this study is to compare two learning methods of surgical procedures, operative textbooks and video-based coaching, in a group of 10 pediatric surgery trainees. Patients and Methods: We selected five surgical procedures to study: three MIS procedures, Nissen fundoplication, partial nephrectomy, and cholecystectomy; and two robotic procedures, Lich-Gregoir reimplantation for vesicoureteral reflux and Henderson-Hynes pyleoplasty for ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Ten trainees were divided into two groups of 5 each, Group 1 (G1) and Group 2 (G2). G1 studied the procedures analyzing videos, G2 studied the same procedure classically reading textbooks. Tutors prepared a questionnaire of 100 multianswered questions that was submitted to both groups, divided into 20 questions for each surgical technique. The questionnaire focused on the different steps of surgical techniques. Results: Analyzing the 10 questionnaires, G1 (video group) obtained a median result of 82 exact answers (74-97), whereas G2 (textbook group) obtained a median result of 64.2 correct answers (53-79). Analyzing statistically the results of two groups, using unpaired t-Student's test with a level of statistical significance >95%, the results of G1 were statistically significantly better that G2 with a P = .0265 for the average scores. Conclusion: Video-based coaching to learn surgical techniques is a novel, feasible, and excellent modality for supplementing surgical techniques learning for pediatric surgery trainees. Objective evaluation using a multianswered questionnaire demonstrates that video-based coaching in pediatric surgery is statistically better than textbook classic education. We suggest to adopt this teaching modality in every surgical training program above all to teach MIS and robotic surgery.

Video-Based Coaching: An Efficient Learning and Teaching Modality for Pediatric Surgery and Pediatric Urology Training Program

Autorino, Giuseppe;Cerulo, Mariapina;Conte, Fulvia Del;Ricci, Ester;Borgogni, Rachele;Cardone, Roberto;Escolino, Maria;
2021

Abstract

Objective: The development of integrated multimedia operating rooms has made possible to record surgical procedures mainly in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and robotic surgery. This modality of video storage allows the trainees to study surgical procedures based on video analysis. The aim of this study is to compare two learning methods of surgical procedures, operative textbooks and video-based coaching, in a group of 10 pediatric surgery trainees. Patients and Methods: We selected five surgical procedures to study: three MIS procedures, Nissen fundoplication, partial nephrectomy, and cholecystectomy; and two robotic procedures, Lich-Gregoir reimplantation for vesicoureteral reflux and Henderson-Hynes pyleoplasty for ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Ten trainees were divided into two groups of 5 each, Group 1 (G1) and Group 2 (G2). G1 studied the procedures analyzing videos, G2 studied the same procedure classically reading textbooks. Tutors prepared a questionnaire of 100 multianswered questions that was submitted to both groups, divided into 20 questions for each surgical technique. The questionnaire focused on the different steps of surgical techniques. Results: Analyzing the 10 questionnaires, G1 (video group) obtained a median result of 82 exact answers (74-97), whereas G2 (textbook group) obtained a median result of 64.2 correct answers (53-79). Analyzing statistically the results of two groups, using unpaired t-Student's test with a level of statistical significance >95%, the results of G1 were statistically significantly better that G2 with a P = .0265 for the average scores. Conclusion: Video-based coaching to learn surgical techniques is a novel, feasible, and excellent modality for supplementing surgical techniques learning for pediatric surgery trainees. Objective evaluation using a multianswered questionnaire demonstrates that video-based coaching in pediatric surgery is statistically better than textbook classic education. We suggest to adopt this teaching modality in every surgical training program above all to teach MIS and robotic surgery.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/901361
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