Objective: Superior eyelid endoscopic transorbital approach (SETOA) is nowadays gaining progressive application in neurosurgical scenarios. Both anatomic and clinical reports have demonstrated the possibility of taking advantage of the orbital corridor as a minimally invasive route to reach anterior and middle cranial fossae and manage selected surgical lesions developing in these areas. The aim of this paper is to further shed light on other anatomic regions of the skull base as seen from a transorbital perspective, namely, the posterior cranial fossa and tentorial area, describing technical feasibility and steps in reaching this area through an extradural-transtentorial approach and providing quantitative evaluations of the “working area” obtained through this route. Material and methods: Four cadaveric heads (eight sides) were dissected at the Laboratory of Surgical Neuroanatomy (LSNA) of the University of Barcelona, Spain. A stepwise dissection of the transorbital approach to the tentorial area was described. Qualitative anatomical descriptions and quantitative analyses of working were evaluated by using pre- and postdissections CT and MRI scans, and three-dimensional reconstructions were made using Amira software. Results: With the endoscopic transorbital approach, posterior cranial fossa dura was reached by an extradural middle cranial fossa approach and drilling of the petrous apex. After clipping the superior petrosal sinus, the tentorium was divided and cut. An endoscope was then introduced in the posterior cranial fossa at the level of the tentorial incisura. Qualitative analysis provided a description of the tentorial and petrosal surfaces of the cerebellum, middle tentorial incisura, cerebellopontine fissures, and, after arachnoid dissection, by a 30° endoscopic visualization, the posterior aspect of the cerebellomesencephalic fissure. Quantitative analysis of the “working area” obtained after bone removal was also provided. Conclusions: This anatomic qualitative and quantitative study sheds light on the anatomy of the posterior cranial fossa contents, such as the tentorial area and incisura, as seen through a transorbital perspective. The first aim of the article is to enrich the anatomical knowledge as seen through this relatively new corridor and to provide quantitative details and insights into the technical feasibility of reaching these regions in a surgical scenario.

Superior eyelid endoscopic transorbital approach to the tentorial area: A qualitative and quantitative anatomic study

Solari D.;Cavallo L. M.;
2022

Abstract

Objective: Superior eyelid endoscopic transorbital approach (SETOA) is nowadays gaining progressive application in neurosurgical scenarios. Both anatomic and clinical reports have demonstrated the possibility of taking advantage of the orbital corridor as a minimally invasive route to reach anterior and middle cranial fossae and manage selected surgical lesions developing in these areas. The aim of this paper is to further shed light on other anatomic regions of the skull base as seen from a transorbital perspective, namely, the posterior cranial fossa and tentorial area, describing technical feasibility and steps in reaching this area through an extradural-transtentorial approach and providing quantitative evaluations of the “working area” obtained through this route. Material and methods: Four cadaveric heads (eight sides) were dissected at the Laboratory of Surgical Neuroanatomy (LSNA) of the University of Barcelona, Spain. A stepwise dissection of the transorbital approach to the tentorial area was described. Qualitative anatomical descriptions and quantitative analyses of working were evaluated by using pre- and postdissections CT and MRI scans, and three-dimensional reconstructions were made using Amira software. Results: With the endoscopic transorbital approach, posterior cranial fossa dura was reached by an extradural middle cranial fossa approach and drilling of the petrous apex. After clipping the superior petrosal sinus, the tentorium was divided and cut. An endoscope was then introduced in the posterior cranial fossa at the level of the tentorial incisura. Qualitative analysis provided a description of the tentorial and petrosal surfaces of the cerebellum, middle tentorial incisura, cerebellopontine fissures, and, after arachnoid dissection, by a 30° endoscopic visualization, the posterior aspect of the cerebellomesencephalic fissure. Quantitative analysis of the “working area” obtained after bone removal was also provided. Conclusions: This anatomic qualitative and quantitative study sheds light on the anatomy of the posterior cranial fossa contents, such as the tentorial area and incisura, as seen through a transorbital perspective. The first aim of the article is to enrich the anatomical knowledge as seen through this relatively new corridor and to provide quantitative details and insights into the technical feasibility of reaching these regions in a surgical scenario.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/901187
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