Lowe syndrome (LS) is a rare, X-linked disorder characterised by numerous symptoms affecting the brain, the eyes, and the kidneys. It is caused by mutations in the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL) protein, a 5-phosphatase localised in different cellular compartments that dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate into phosphatidylinositol-4-monophosphate. Some patients with LS also have bleeding disorders, with normal to low platelet (PLT) count and impaired PLT function. However, the mechanism of PLT dysfunction in patients with LS is not completely understood. The main function of PLTs is to activate upon vessel wall injury and stop the bleeding by clot formation. PLT activation is accompanied by a shape change that is a result of massive cytoskeletal rearrangements. Here, we show that OCRL-inhibited human PLTs do not fully spread, form mostly filopodia, and accumulate actin nodules. These nodules co-localise with ARP2/3 subunit p34, vinculin, and sorting nexin 9. Furthermore, OCRL-inhibited PLTs have a retained microtubular coil with high levels of acetylated tubulin. Also, myosin light chain phosphorylation is decreased upon OCRL inhibition, without impaired degranulation or integrin activation. Taken together, these results suggest that OCRL contributes to cytoskeletal rearrangements during PLT activation that could explain mild bleeding problems in patients with LS.

Oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe protein controls cytoskeletal reorganisation during human platelet spreading

de Matteis, Maria Antonietta;
2022

Abstract

Lowe syndrome (LS) is a rare, X-linked disorder characterised by numerous symptoms affecting the brain, the eyes, and the kidneys. It is caused by mutations in the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL) protein, a 5-phosphatase localised in different cellular compartments that dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate into phosphatidylinositol-4-monophosphate. Some patients with LS also have bleeding disorders, with normal to low platelet (PLT) count and impaired PLT function. However, the mechanism of PLT dysfunction in patients with LS is not completely understood. The main function of PLTs is to activate upon vessel wall injury and stop the bleeding by clot formation. PLT activation is accompanied by a shape change that is a result of massive cytoskeletal rearrangements. Here, we show that OCRL-inhibited human PLTs do not fully spread, form mostly filopodia, and accumulate actin nodules. These nodules co-localise with ARP2/3 subunit p34, vinculin, and sorting nexin 9. Furthermore, OCRL-inhibited PLTs have a retained microtubular coil with high levels of acetylated tubulin. Also, myosin light chain phosphorylation is decreased upon OCRL inhibition, without impaired degranulation or integrin activation. Taken together, these results suggest that OCRL contributes to cytoskeletal rearrangements during PLT activation that could explain mild bleeding problems in patients with LS.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/900461
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