The aim of the Divertor Tokamak Test (DTT) facility, whose construction is starting at ENEA premises in Frascati, Italy, is to test different concepts of divertors under integrated physics and technical conditions that can reliably be extrapolated to DEMO experimental plant. The replacement of the divertor inside the Vacuum Vessel is, therefore, not simply a chance in case of failure of a divertor cassette, but a scheduled event that will occur several times in the lifetime of the machine. This operation, as well as replacement of First Wall modules (in case of failure), is therefore necessary and must be carried out through a Remote Handling (RH) System, being humans not allowed to enter inside the Vacuum Vessel, due to the high radiation levels inside it, and to stay in contact with activated dusts. The compact dimension of the DTT machine and, at the same time, the great dimensions of coils needed to get the requested performance, constrain port dimensions and, consequently, add additional issues to the design of the RH System. Starting from RH strategy already conceived by CREATE Consortium, and moving from a continuously growing list of technical and functional requirements, this paper describes the iterative process based on a system engineering approach which is driving the conceptual design of the main RH equipment for Divertor and First Wall modules. Compliance of the conceived concepts with requirements has been confirmed by first simulations on static force analysis, workspace and dexterity evaluation.

Remote Handling System for the DTT Fusion Reactor: A System Engineering Approach for Preliminary Conceptual Design of the Main Robotic Equipment

Grazioso S.;G. Di Gironimo
2021

Abstract

The aim of the Divertor Tokamak Test (DTT) facility, whose construction is starting at ENEA premises in Frascati, Italy, is to test different concepts of divertors under integrated physics and technical conditions that can reliably be extrapolated to DEMO experimental plant. The replacement of the divertor inside the Vacuum Vessel is, therefore, not simply a chance in case of failure of a divertor cassette, but a scheduled event that will occur several times in the lifetime of the machine. This operation, as well as replacement of First Wall modules (in case of failure), is therefore necessary and must be carried out through a Remote Handling (RH) System, being humans not allowed to enter inside the Vacuum Vessel, due to the high radiation levels inside it, and to stay in contact with activated dusts. The compact dimension of the DTT machine and, at the same time, the great dimensions of coils needed to get the requested performance, constrain port dimensions and, consequently, add additional issues to the design of the RH System. Starting from RH strategy already conceived by CREATE Consortium, and moving from a continuously growing list of technical and functional requirements, this paper describes the iterative process based on a system engineering approach which is driving the conceptual design of the main RH equipment for Divertor and First Wall modules. Compliance of the conceived concepts with requirements has been confirmed by first simulations on static force analysis, workspace and dexterity evaluation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/890673
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