Background: An adequate blood supply plays a leading role in the healing process of the post-extractive socket; its coagulation leads to fibrin clot formation, which acts as a physical barrier able to prevent postoperative bleeding and microbial infection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of antiaggregant drugs in healing post-extraction sockets compared to natural wound healing. Methods: This was a single-center prospective clinical trial. Extraction sockets allocated in healthy patients and in patients assuming antiplatelet drugs were considered. Thirty consecutive patients under (treated with/in treatment with) oral antiplatelet treatment were enrolled in the test group. In order to provide a control group, 30 consecutive patients meeting all the exclusion and inclusion criteria were enrolled. The extraction of the mono-radicular tooth was atraumatically performed without gingivoplasty or osteotomy procedures that could influence the healing process. Photographs were obtained before and immediately after surgery and at 3-, 7-, 14-and 28-days follow-up. Results: All patients assumed the prescribed therapy and their postoperative recovery was uneventful without any kind of post-extractive complications. The results of inter-group comparison show that on the third and seventh days of follow-up, the antiplatelet group expressed a statistically significant higher level of healing compared to the control group (p < 0.05), while no statistically significant differences were recorded at 14-and 28-days follow-up. Conclusions: Patients treated with antiplatelet agents seemed to show that this therapy can positively affect the healing process after tooth extractions.

Influence of the Antithrombotic Therapy in the Healing of Simple Post-Extraction Sockets: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Sammartino G.;Gasparro R.;Spagnuolo G.;Blasi A.;Marenzi G.
2022

Abstract

Background: An adequate blood supply plays a leading role in the healing process of the post-extractive socket; its coagulation leads to fibrin clot formation, which acts as a physical barrier able to prevent postoperative bleeding and microbial infection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of antiaggregant drugs in healing post-extraction sockets compared to natural wound healing. Methods: This was a single-center prospective clinical trial. Extraction sockets allocated in healthy patients and in patients assuming antiplatelet drugs were considered. Thirty consecutive patients under (treated with/in treatment with) oral antiplatelet treatment were enrolled in the test group. In order to provide a control group, 30 consecutive patients meeting all the exclusion and inclusion criteria were enrolled. The extraction of the mono-radicular tooth was atraumatically performed without gingivoplasty or osteotomy procedures that could influence the healing process. Photographs were obtained before and immediately after surgery and at 3-, 7-, 14-and 28-days follow-up. Results: All patients assumed the prescribed therapy and their postoperative recovery was uneventful without any kind of post-extractive complications. The results of inter-group comparison show that on the third and seventh days of follow-up, the antiplatelet group expressed a statistically significant higher level of healing compared to the control group (p < 0.05), while no statistically significant differences were recorded at 14-and 28-days follow-up. Conclusions: Patients treated with antiplatelet agents seemed to show that this therapy can positively affect the healing process after tooth extractions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/890408
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