Monocyte recruitment after vascular injury and their migration through the vessel wall represent crucial events in the initiation, progression, and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaque. Circulating monocytes are exposed to stimuli that alter their physiological state, and among them, lipids play a key role. Several studies investigated the mechanisms by which lipids affect monocyte functions promoting coronary atherosclerotic plaque initiation, but information on the relationship between lipid composition and function of monocyte is scant. We aimed at studying the migration of circulating monocytes isolated from patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) at hospital presentation and investigating its correlation with cellular lipid profile. The migration of monocytes was tested using both fetal bovine serum (FBS) and autologous serum as chemoattractant stimuli. Monocyte lipid profile was evaluated through an untargeted lipidomics approach, using a liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry platform. We observed that AMI patients' monocytes showed a significant increase in FBS and autologous serum-mediated migration compared to controls. Moreover, a different monocyte lipidomic profile between the two study groups was detected. In particular, AMI patients' monocytes showed an altered composition in ceramides, with an increase in lactosylceramide and in phospholipids (ie, phosphatidylethanolamine and lisophosphatidylethanolamine). Of note, a positive correlation between lactosylceramide levels and monocyte migration was observed. Furthermore, the lactosylceramide synthase inhibition significantly reduced FBS-induced monocyte migration. Our results highlight the influence of lactosylceramide on the monocyte migration capacity, pointing out a new possible mechanism of lipids in the onset of atherothrombosis and, hence, in AMI.

Lipidomics analysis of monocytes from patients with acute myocardial infarction reveals lactosylceramide as a new player in monocyte migration

Di Minno, Alessandro;
2021

Abstract

Monocyte recruitment after vascular injury and their migration through the vessel wall represent crucial events in the initiation, progression, and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaque. Circulating monocytes are exposed to stimuli that alter their physiological state, and among them, lipids play a key role. Several studies investigated the mechanisms by which lipids affect monocyte functions promoting coronary atherosclerotic plaque initiation, but information on the relationship between lipid composition and function of monocyte is scant. We aimed at studying the migration of circulating monocytes isolated from patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) at hospital presentation and investigating its correlation with cellular lipid profile. The migration of monocytes was tested using both fetal bovine serum (FBS) and autologous serum as chemoattractant stimuli. Monocyte lipid profile was evaluated through an untargeted lipidomics approach, using a liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry platform. We observed that AMI patients' monocytes showed a significant increase in FBS and autologous serum-mediated migration compared to controls. Moreover, a different monocyte lipidomic profile between the two study groups was detected. In particular, AMI patients' monocytes showed an altered composition in ceramides, with an increase in lactosylceramide and in phospholipids (ie, phosphatidylethanolamine and lisophosphatidylethanolamine). Of note, a positive correlation between lactosylceramide levels and monocyte migration was observed. Furthermore, the lactosylceramide synthase inhibition significantly reduced FBS-induced monocyte migration. Our results highlight the influence of lactosylceramide on the monocyte migration capacity, pointing out a new possible mechanism of lipids in the onset of atherothrombosis and, hence, in AMI.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/889981
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