Purpose: COVID-19 pandemics and cardiometabolic health are mutually interconnected. Chronic metabolic diseases are known risk factors for increased mortality after SARS-CoV-2 infection. In turn, COVID pandemics imposed sudden changes in lifestyle and social isolation with consequent potential cardiometabolic sequelae. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of changes in lifestyle and social life on metabolic profile in hyperprolactinemic or osteoporotic patients without pre-existing cardiometabolic diseases at the time of COVID-19. Methods: The primary study outcome measurement was the prevalence of obesity, arterial hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or diabetes mellitus (DM), dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome after COVID-19 outbreak. Seventy-four patients (21 men and 53 women, aged 51.8 ± 17.8 years) were admitted to the outpatient clinic of the Neuroendocrine Disease Unit at University “Federico II” of Naples, Italy, as per their routine clinical practice because of tumoral and non-tumoral hyperprolactinemia in 52 patients (70.3%), and osteoporosis/osteopenia in 22 (29.7%). Among female patients, 25 (47.2%) were at menopausal age. Results: At the end of lockdown, prevalence of obesity (from 37.8% to 51.3%, p < 0.0001), dyslipidemia (from 28.4 to 48.6%, p = 0.003) and metabolic syndrome (from 14.9 to 27%, p < 0.0001) significantly increased compared to pre-COVID evaluation. No significant change was found in the prevalence of arterial hypertension and IGT/DM. Conclusion: SARS-CoV-2 outbreak has led to a rapid increase in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, potentially contributing to the increased COVID-19 related mortality.

Metabolic syndrome in the era of COVID-19 outbreak: impact of lockdown on cardiometabolic health / Auriemma, R. S.; Pirchio, R.; Liccardi, A.; Scairati, R.; Del Vecchio, G.; Pivonello, R.; Colao, A.. - In: JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION. - ISSN 0391-4097. - 44:12(2021), pp. 2845-2847. [10.1007/s40618-021-01563-y]

Metabolic syndrome in the era of COVID-19 outbreak: impact of lockdown on cardiometabolic health

Auriemma R. S.;Pirchio R.;Liccardi A.;Scairati R.;Del Vecchio G.;Pivonello R.;Colao A.
2021

Abstract

Purpose: COVID-19 pandemics and cardiometabolic health are mutually interconnected. Chronic metabolic diseases are known risk factors for increased mortality after SARS-CoV-2 infection. In turn, COVID pandemics imposed sudden changes in lifestyle and social isolation with consequent potential cardiometabolic sequelae. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of changes in lifestyle and social life on metabolic profile in hyperprolactinemic or osteoporotic patients without pre-existing cardiometabolic diseases at the time of COVID-19. Methods: The primary study outcome measurement was the prevalence of obesity, arterial hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or diabetes mellitus (DM), dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome after COVID-19 outbreak. Seventy-four patients (21 men and 53 women, aged 51.8 ± 17.8 years) were admitted to the outpatient clinic of the Neuroendocrine Disease Unit at University “Federico II” of Naples, Italy, as per their routine clinical practice because of tumoral and non-tumoral hyperprolactinemia in 52 patients (70.3%), and osteoporosis/osteopenia in 22 (29.7%). Among female patients, 25 (47.2%) were at menopausal age. Results: At the end of lockdown, prevalence of obesity (from 37.8% to 51.3%, p < 0.0001), dyslipidemia (from 28.4 to 48.6%, p = 0.003) and metabolic syndrome (from 14.9 to 27%, p < 0.0001) significantly increased compared to pre-COVID evaluation. No significant change was found in the prevalence of arterial hypertension and IGT/DM. Conclusion: SARS-CoV-2 outbreak has led to a rapid increase in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, potentially contributing to the increased COVID-19 related mortality.
2021
Metabolic syndrome in the era of COVID-19 outbreak: impact of lockdown on cardiometabolic health / Auriemma, R. S.; Pirchio, R.; Liccardi, A.; Scairati, R.; Del Vecchio, G.; Pivonello, R.; Colao, A.. - In: JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION. - ISSN 0391-4097. - 44:12(2021), pp. 2845-2847. [10.1007/s40618-021-01563-y]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/875705
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 18
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 18
social impact