Given the epidemiologic increase of aged population in the world, aortic stenosis (AS) represents now the most common valvular heart disease in industrialized countries. It is a very challenging disease, representing an important cause of morbidity, hospitalization and death in the elderly population. It is widely recognized that AS is the result of a very complex active process, driven by inflammation and involving multifactorial pathological mechanisms promoting valvular calcification and valvular bone deposition. Several evidence suggest that epicardial adipose tissue (EAT), the visceral fat depot of the heart, represents a direct source of cytokines and could mediate the deleterious effects of systemic inflammation on the myocardium. Importantly, obesity and metabolic disorders are associated with chronic systemic inflammation leading to a significant increase of EAT amount and to a pro-inflammatory phenotypic shift of this fat depot. It has been hypothesized that the EAT inflammatory state can influence the structure and function of the heart, thus contributing to the pathogenesis of several cardiac diseases, including calcific AS. The current review will discuss the recently discovered mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AS, with particular attention to the role of inflammation, metabolic risk factors and pro-fibrotic and pro-osteogenic signal pathways promoting the onset and progression of the disease. Moreover, it will be explored the potential role of EAT in the AS pathophysiology.

The role of inflammation and metabolic risk factors in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic valve stenosis / Conte, M.; Petraglia, L.; Campana, P.; Gerundo, G.; Caruso, A.; Grimaldi, M. G.; Russo, V.; Attena, E.; Leosco, D.; Parisi, V.. - In: AGING CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH. - ISSN 1594-0667. - 33:7(2021), pp. 1765-1770. [10.1007/s40520-020-01681-2]

The role of inflammation and metabolic risk factors in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic valve stenosis

Conte M.;Petraglia L.;Campana P.;Gerundo G.;Grimaldi M. G.;Leosco D.;Parisi V.
2021

Abstract

Given the epidemiologic increase of aged population in the world, aortic stenosis (AS) represents now the most common valvular heart disease in industrialized countries. It is a very challenging disease, representing an important cause of morbidity, hospitalization and death in the elderly population. It is widely recognized that AS is the result of a very complex active process, driven by inflammation and involving multifactorial pathological mechanisms promoting valvular calcification and valvular bone deposition. Several evidence suggest that epicardial adipose tissue (EAT), the visceral fat depot of the heart, represents a direct source of cytokines and could mediate the deleterious effects of systemic inflammation on the myocardium. Importantly, obesity and metabolic disorders are associated with chronic systemic inflammation leading to a significant increase of EAT amount and to a pro-inflammatory phenotypic shift of this fat depot. It has been hypothesized that the EAT inflammatory state can influence the structure and function of the heart, thus contributing to the pathogenesis of several cardiac diseases, including calcific AS. The current review will discuss the recently discovered mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AS, with particular attention to the role of inflammation, metabolic risk factors and pro-fibrotic and pro-osteogenic signal pathways promoting the onset and progression of the disease. Moreover, it will be explored the potential role of EAT in the AS pathophysiology.
2021
The role of inflammation and metabolic risk factors in the pathogenesis of calcific aortic valve stenosis / Conte, M.; Petraglia, L.; Campana, P.; Gerundo, G.; Caruso, A.; Grimaldi, M. G.; Russo, V.; Attena, E.; Leosco, D.; Parisi, V.. - In: AGING CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH. - ISSN 1594-0667. - 33:7(2021), pp. 1765-1770. [10.1007/s40520-020-01681-2]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/874298
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