Animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) are being implemented in many countries for the beneficial effects they have on humans. Patients involved in AAI are often individuals at greater risk of acquiring infections, and these activities involve close contact between humans and animals, as is the case with humans living with a pet. The spread of multidrug-resistant Enterobacterales is a serious problem for human health; an integrated One Health strategy is imperative to combat this threat. Companion dogs can be a reservoir of multidrug-resistant pathogens, and animal-to-human transmission could occur during AAI sessions. The aim of this review was to collect the available data on the carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales in companion dogs and in an AAI context. Several papers have generally addressed the issue of microbial transmission during AAIs. Studies on the intestinal carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and/or carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales have mainly been conducted in companion animals while few data are available on the carriage in dogs participating in AAI sessions. This review aims to draw attention to the antibiotic resistance problem in a One Health context and to the importance of extending infection control measures to this human-animal interface, to keep the balance of benefits/risks for AAIs shifted towards the benefits of these activities.

Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing and Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacterales in Companion and Animal-Assisted Interventions Dogs

Emanuela Roscetto;Maria Rosaria Catania
2021

Abstract

Animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) are being implemented in many countries for the beneficial effects they have on humans. Patients involved in AAI are often individuals at greater risk of acquiring infections, and these activities involve close contact between humans and animals, as is the case with humans living with a pet. The spread of multidrug-resistant Enterobacterales is a serious problem for human health; an integrated One Health strategy is imperative to combat this threat. Companion dogs can be a reservoir of multidrug-resistant pathogens, and animal-to-human transmission could occur during AAI sessions. The aim of this review was to collect the available data on the carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales in companion dogs and in an AAI context. Several papers have generally addressed the issue of microbial transmission during AAIs. Studies on the intestinal carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and/or carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales have mainly been conducted in companion animals while few data are available on the carriage in dogs participating in AAI sessions. This review aims to draw attention to the antibiotic resistance problem in a One Health context and to the importance of extending infection control measures to this human-animal interface, to keep the balance of benefits/risks for AAIs shifted towards the benefits of these activities.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/866746
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