COVID-19 is a global threat that has spread since the end of 2019, causing severe clinical sequelae and deaths, in the context of a world pandemic. The infection of the highly pathogenetic and infectious SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has been proven to exert systemic effects impacting the metabolism. Yet, the metabolic pathways involved in the pathophysiology and progression of COVID-19 are still unclear. Here, we present the results of a mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomic analysis on a cohort of 52 hospitalized COVID-19 patients, classified according to disease severity as mild, moderate, and severe. Our analysis defines a clear signature of COVID-19 that includes increased serum levels of lactic acid in all the forms of the disease. Pathway analysis revealed dysregulation of energy production and amino acid metabolism. Globally, the variations found in the serum metabolome of COVID-19 patients may reflect a more complex systemic perturbation induced by SARS-CoV-2, possibly affecting carbon and nitrogen liver metabolism.

The Serum Metabolome of Moderate and Severe COVID-19 Patients Reflects Possible Liver Alterations Involving Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism / Caterino, Marianna; Costanzo, Michele; Fedele, Roberta; Cevenini, Armando; Gelzo, Monica; DI MINNO, Alessandro; Andolfo, Immacolata; Capasso, Mario; Russo, Roberta; Annunziata, Anna; Calabrese, Cecilia; Fiorentino, Giuseppe; D’Abbraccio, Maurizio; Dell’Isola, Chiara; Maria Fusco, Francesco; Parrella, Roberto; Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Gentile, Ivan; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Margherita. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES. - ISSN 1422-0067. - 22:17 (article number 9548)(2021), pp. 1-18. [10.3390/ijms22179548]

The Serum Metabolome of Moderate and Severe COVID-19 Patients Reflects Possible Liver Alterations Involving Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism

Marianna Caterino;Michele Costanzo
Co-primo
;
Armando Cevenini;Monica Gelzo;Alessandro Di Minno;Immacolata Andolfo;Mario Capasso;Roberta Russo;Gabriella Fabbrocini;Ivan Gentile;Giuseppe Castaldo;Margherita Ruoppolo
2021

Abstract

COVID-19 is a global threat that has spread since the end of 2019, causing severe clinical sequelae and deaths, in the context of a world pandemic. The infection of the highly pathogenetic and infectious SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has been proven to exert systemic effects impacting the metabolism. Yet, the metabolic pathways involved in the pathophysiology and progression of COVID-19 are still unclear. Here, we present the results of a mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomic analysis on a cohort of 52 hospitalized COVID-19 patients, classified according to disease severity as mild, moderate, and severe. Our analysis defines a clear signature of COVID-19 that includes increased serum levels of lactic acid in all the forms of the disease. Pathway analysis revealed dysregulation of energy production and amino acid metabolism. Globally, the variations found in the serum metabolome of COVID-19 patients may reflect a more complex systemic perturbation induced by SARS-CoV-2, possibly affecting carbon and nitrogen liver metabolism.
2021
The Serum Metabolome of Moderate and Severe COVID-19 Patients Reflects Possible Liver Alterations Involving Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism / Caterino, Marianna; Costanzo, Michele; Fedele, Roberta; Cevenini, Armando; Gelzo, Monica; DI MINNO, Alessandro; Andolfo, Immacolata; Capasso, Mario; Russo, Roberta; Annunziata, Anna; Calabrese, Cecilia; Fiorentino, Giuseppe; D’Abbraccio, Maurizio; Dell’Isola, Chiara; Maria Fusco, Francesco; Parrella, Roberto; Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Gentile, Ivan; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Margherita. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES. - ISSN 1422-0067. - 22:17 (article number 9548)(2021), pp. 1-18. [10.3390/ijms22179548]
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/858517
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 50
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 48
social impact