The aim of the study was to describe the pregnancy outcome of a large cohort of women with toxoplasmosis seroconversion in pregnancy and to investigate the relation between maternal lymphadenopathy and risk of congenital toxoplasmosis (CT). This was a retrospective study involving women with confirmed toxoplasmosis seroconversion in pregnancy between 2001 and 2017. Women were clinically evaluated for lymphadenopathy and classified as follows: lymphadenopathy absent (L-) or lymphadenopathy present (L+). The mothers were treated and followed-up according to local protocol, and neonates were monitored at least for 1 year in order to diagnose CT. A total of 218 women (one twin pregnancy) were included in the analysis. Pregnancy outcome was as follows: 149 (68%) of children not infected, 62 (28.3%) infected, 4 (1.8%) first trimester termination of pregnancy, 2 (0.9%) first trimester miscarriages, and 3 (1.4%) stillbirths (of which one already counted in the infected cohort). 13.8% of women were L+ , and they were nearly three times more likely to have a child with CT compared to L- women (aOR, 2.90; 95%CI, 1.28–6.58). Moreover, the result was still statistically significant when the analysis was restricted to 81 children whose mothers were clinically examined and received treatment within 5 weeks from estimated time of infection. In conclusion, there is a positive association between L+ status in pregnant women, and risk of CT also confirmed when restricting the analysis to women with early diagnosis of seroconversion and treatment. This data could be very useful in counselling pregnant women with toxoplasmosis seroconversion and lead to direct a more specific therapeutic and diagnostic protocol.

Association between lymphadenopathy after toxoplasmosis seroconversion in pregnancy and risk of congenital infection

Donadono V.;Saccone G.;Sarno L.;Mazzarelli L. L.;Sirico A.;Guida M.;Martinelli P.;Zullo F.;Maruotti G. M.
2021

Abstract

The aim of the study was to describe the pregnancy outcome of a large cohort of women with toxoplasmosis seroconversion in pregnancy and to investigate the relation between maternal lymphadenopathy and risk of congenital toxoplasmosis (CT). This was a retrospective study involving women with confirmed toxoplasmosis seroconversion in pregnancy between 2001 and 2017. Women were clinically evaluated for lymphadenopathy and classified as follows: lymphadenopathy absent (L-) or lymphadenopathy present (L+). The mothers were treated and followed-up according to local protocol, and neonates were monitored at least for 1 year in order to diagnose CT. A total of 218 women (one twin pregnancy) were included in the analysis. Pregnancy outcome was as follows: 149 (68%) of children not infected, 62 (28.3%) infected, 4 (1.8%) first trimester termination of pregnancy, 2 (0.9%) first trimester miscarriages, and 3 (1.4%) stillbirths (of which one already counted in the infected cohort). 13.8% of women were L+ , and they were nearly three times more likely to have a child with CT compared to L- women (aOR, 2.90; 95%CI, 1.28–6.58). Moreover, the result was still statistically significant when the analysis was restricted to 81 children whose mothers were clinically examined and received treatment within 5 weeks from estimated time of infection. In conclusion, there is a positive association between L+ status in pregnant women, and risk of CT also confirmed when restricting the analysis to women with early diagnosis of seroconversion and treatment. This data could be very useful in counselling pregnant women with toxoplasmosis seroconversion and lead to direct a more specific therapeutic and diagnostic protocol.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/857093
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 1
social impact