Despite the well-known role of chronic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in causing tumors (i.e., all cervical cancers and other human malignancies from the mucosal squamous epithelia, including anogenital and oropharyngeal cavity), its persistence is not sufficient for cancer development. Other co-factors contribute to the carcinogenesis process. Recently, the critical role of the underlying stroma during the HPV life cycle and HPV-induced disease have been investigated. The tumor stroma is a key component of the tumor microenvironment (TME), which is a specialized entity. The TME is dynamic, interactive, and constantly changing—able to trigger, support, and drive tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis. In previous years, in vitro organotypic raft cultures and in vivo genetically engineered mouse models have provided researchers with important information on the interactions between HPVs and the epithelium. Further development for an in-depth understanding of the interaction between HPV-infected tissue and the surrounding microenvironment is strongly required. In this review, we critically describe the HPV-related cancers modeled in vitro from the simplified ‘raft culture’ to complex three-dimensional (3D) organotypic models, focusing on HPV-associated cervical cancer disease platforms. In addition, we review the latest knowledge in the field of in vitro culture systems of HPV-associated malignancies of other mucosal squamous epithelia (anogenital and oropharynx), as well as rare cutaneous non-melanoma associated cancer.

In vitro organotypic systems to model tumor microenvironment in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers

De Gregorio V.
Primo
;
Urciuolo F.;Netti P. A.;
2020

Abstract

Despite the well-known role of chronic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in causing tumors (i.e., all cervical cancers and other human malignancies from the mucosal squamous epithelia, including anogenital and oropharyngeal cavity), its persistence is not sufficient for cancer development. Other co-factors contribute to the carcinogenesis process. Recently, the critical role of the underlying stroma during the HPV life cycle and HPV-induced disease have been investigated. The tumor stroma is a key component of the tumor microenvironment (TME), which is a specialized entity. The TME is dynamic, interactive, and constantly changing—able to trigger, support, and drive tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis. In previous years, in vitro organotypic raft cultures and in vivo genetically engineered mouse models have provided researchers with important information on the interactions between HPVs and the epithelium. Further development for an in-depth understanding of the interaction between HPV-infected tissue and the surrounding microenvironment is strongly required. In this review, we critically describe the HPV-related cancers modeled in vitro from the simplified ‘raft culture’ to complex three-dimensional (3D) organotypic models, focusing on HPV-associated cervical cancer disease platforms. In addition, we review the latest knowledge in the field of in vitro culture systems of HPV-associated malignancies of other mucosal squamous epithelia (anogenital and oropharynx), as well as rare cutaneous non-melanoma associated cancer.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/835538
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