In 2010, serrated polyps (SP) of the colon have been included in the WHO classification of digestive tumors. Since then a large corpus of evidence focusing on these lesions are available in theliterature. This review aims to analyze the present data on the epidemiological and molecular aspects of SP. Hyperplastic polyps (HPs) are the most common subtype of SP (70-90%), with a minimal or null risk of malignant transformation, contrarily to sessile serrated lesions (SSLs) and traditionalserrated adenomas (TSAs), which represent 10-20% and 1% of adenomas, respectively. The malignant transformation, when occurs, is supported by a specific genetic pathway, known as the serrated-neoplasia pathway. The time needed for malignant transformation is not known, but it may occur rapidly insome lesions. Current evidence suggests that a detection rate of SP ≥15% should be expected in apopulation undergoing screening colonoscopy. There are no differences between primary colonoscopiesand those carried out after positive occult fecal blood tests, as this screening test fails to identify SP, which rarely bleed. Genetic similarities between SP and interval cancers suggest that these cancers could arise from missed SP. Hence, the detection rate of serrated-lesions should be evaluated as a quality indicator of colonoscopy. There is a lack of high-quality longitudinal studies analyzing the long-term risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC), as well as the cancer risk factors and molecular tissue biomarkers. Further studies are needed to define an evidence-based surveillance program after the removal of SP, which is currently suggested based on experts' opinions.

Serrated lesions of the colon and rectum: Emergent epidemiological data and molecular pathways / Sacco, M.; De Palma, F. D. E.; Guadagno, E.; Giglio, M. C.; Peltrini, R.; Marra, E.; Manfreda, A.; Amendola, A.; Cassese, G.; Dinuzzi, V. P.; Pegoraro, F.; Tropeano, F. P.; Luglio, G.; De Palma, G. D.. - In: OPEN MEDICINE. - ISSN 1911-2092. - 15:1(2020), pp. 1087-1095. [10.1515/med-2020-0226]

Serrated lesions of the colon and rectum: Emergent epidemiological data and molecular pathways

De Palma F. D. E.;Guadagno E.;Giglio M. C.;Peltrini R.;Manfreda A.;Dinuzzi V. P.;Pegoraro F.;Tropeano F. P.;Luglio G.;De Palma G. D.
2020

Abstract

In 2010, serrated polyps (SP) of the colon have been included in the WHO classification of digestive tumors. Since then a large corpus of evidence focusing on these lesions are available in theliterature. This review aims to analyze the present data on the epidemiological and molecular aspects of SP. Hyperplastic polyps (HPs) are the most common subtype of SP (70-90%), with a minimal or null risk of malignant transformation, contrarily to sessile serrated lesions (SSLs) and traditionalserrated adenomas (TSAs), which represent 10-20% and 1% of adenomas, respectively. The malignant transformation, when occurs, is supported by a specific genetic pathway, known as the serrated-neoplasia pathway. The time needed for malignant transformation is not known, but it may occur rapidly insome lesions. Current evidence suggests that a detection rate of SP ≥15% should be expected in apopulation undergoing screening colonoscopy. There are no differences between primary colonoscopiesand those carried out after positive occult fecal blood tests, as this screening test fails to identify SP, which rarely bleed. Genetic similarities between SP and interval cancers suggest that these cancers could arise from missed SP. Hence, the detection rate of serrated-lesions should be evaluated as a quality indicator of colonoscopy. There is a lack of high-quality longitudinal studies analyzing the long-term risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC), as well as the cancer risk factors and molecular tissue biomarkers. Further studies are needed to define an evidence-based surveillance program after the removal of SP, which is currently suggested based on experts' opinions.
2020
Serrated lesions of the colon and rectum: Emergent epidemiological data and molecular pathways / Sacco, M.; De Palma, F. D. E.; Guadagno, E.; Giglio, M. C.; Peltrini, R.; Marra, E.; Manfreda, A.; Amendola, A.; Cassese, G.; Dinuzzi, V. P.; Pegoraro, F.; Tropeano, F. P.; Luglio, G.; De Palma, G. D.. - In: OPEN MEDICINE. - ISSN 1911-2092. - 15:1(2020), pp. 1087-1095. [10.1515/med-2020-0226]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/832929
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