Epigenetic mechanisms, such as alterations in histone acetylation based on histone deacetylases (HDACs) activity, have been linked not only to normal brain function but also to several brain disorders including epilepsy and the epileptogenic process. In WAG/Rij rats, a genetic model of absence epilepsy, epileptogenesis and mild-depression comorbidity, we investigated the effects of two HDAC inhibitors (HDACi), namely sodium butyrate (NaB), valproic acid (VPA) and their co-administration, on the development of absence seizures and related psychiatric/neurologic comorbidities following two different experimental paradigms. Treatment effects have been evaluated by EEG recordings (EEG) and behavioural tests at different time points. Prolonged and daily VPA and NaB treatment, started before absence seizure onset (P30), significantly reduced the development of absence epilepsy showing antiepileptogenic effects. These effects were enhanced by NaB/VPA co-administration. Furthermore, early-chronic HDACi treatment improved depressive-like behaviour and cognitive performance 1 month after treatment withdrawal. WAG/Rij rats of 7 months of age showed reduced acetylated levels of histone H3 and H4, analysed by Western Blotting of homogenized brain, in comparison to WAG/Rij before seizure onset (P30). The brain histone acetylation increased significantly during treatment with NaB or VPA alone and more markedly during co-administration. We also observed decreased expression of both HDAC1 and 3 following HDACi treatment compared to control group. Our results suggest that histone modifications may have a crucial role in the development of epilepsy and early treatment with HDACi might be a possible strategy for preventing epileptogenesis also affecting behavioural comorbidities.

Effects of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors on the Development of Epilepsy and Psychiatric Comorbidity in WAG/Rij Rats

De Caro C.;Mattace Raso G.;Russo Roberto;Calignano A.;
2020

Abstract

Epigenetic mechanisms, such as alterations in histone acetylation based on histone deacetylases (HDACs) activity, have been linked not only to normal brain function but also to several brain disorders including epilepsy and the epileptogenic process. In WAG/Rij rats, a genetic model of absence epilepsy, epileptogenesis and mild-depression comorbidity, we investigated the effects of two HDAC inhibitors (HDACi), namely sodium butyrate (NaB), valproic acid (VPA) and their co-administration, on the development of absence seizures and related psychiatric/neurologic comorbidities following two different experimental paradigms. Treatment effects have been evaluated by EEG recordings (EEG) and behavioural tests at different time points. Prolonged and daily VPA and NaB treatment, started before absence seizure onset (P30), significantly reduced the development of absence epilepsy showing antiepileptogenic effects. These effects were enhanced by NaB/VPA co-administration. Furthermore, early-chronic HDACi treatment improved depressive-like behaviour and cognitive performance 1 month after treatment withdrawal. WAG/Rij rats of 7 months of age showed reduced acetylated levels of histone H3 and H4, analysed by Western Blotting of homogenized brain, in comparison to WAG/Rij before seizure onset (P30). The brain histone acetylation increased significantly during treatment with NaB or VPA alone and more markedly during co-administration. We also observed decreased expression of both HDAC1 and 3 following HDACi treatment compared to control group. Our results suggest that histone modifications may have a crucial role in the development of epilepsy and early treatment with HDACi might be a possible strategy for preventing epileptogenesis also affecting behavioural comorbidities.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/775032
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