In the view of Space exploration, plants will have a key role in Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSSs) to sustain human permanence in extraterrestrial environments. In Space, plant growth might be strictly inhibited by ionizing radiation of different quality and type. Within this framework, there is common agreement on the need to investigate plant response to ionizing radiation as one of the most limiting Space factors. This study aimed to test the effects of sub-lethal doses (1, 10 Gy) of C and Ti heavy ions, provided at dry-seed stage, on the development of dwarf bean plants (Dolichos melanophtalmus DC.) to assess whether low doses of heavy ions may induce stimulation of specific physiological traits rather than cause constraints in plant growth and photosynthesis. To reach this goal, the life cycle of plants from irradiated seeds was followed from seed-to-seed. Plant development was monitored by recording plant height, leaf area, number of leaves, flowers and pods. Photosynthesis was monitored by fluorescence measurements and photosynthetic pigment content amount. The occurrence of oxidative stress, as well as plant capability to counteract the radiation-induced changes, was assessed by the determination of endogenous hydrogen peroxide production, acid ascorbic amount and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity. Our results showed that all plants complete the life cycle, producing new seeds; however C ions at dose of 10 Gy induced constraints in plant growth, seed production and leaf lamina expansion, compared to control and other treatments. Photosynthetic activity was also reduced by 10 Gy C treatment. Both C and Ti ions at dose of 10 Gy determined a significant an increase in intracellular hydrogen peroxide, ascorbic acid amount and PARP activity. The overall results indicate that both C and Ti ions at the dose of 10 Gy stimulate defense mechanisms in dwarf bean plants, thus preventing harmful consequences that may compromise plant viability.

Dwarf bean as eligible candidate for cultivation in artificial ecosystems in Space: heavy ions-induced changes in higher plants.

Vitale E.;De Micco V.;Amitrano C.;De Maio A.;Arena C.
2017

Abstract

In the view of Space exploration, plants will have a key role in Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSSs) to sustain human permanence in extraterrestrial environments. In Space, plant growth might be strictly inhibited by ionizing radiation of different quality and type. Within this framework, there is common agreement on the need to investigate plant response to ionizing radiation as one of the most limiting Space factors. This study aimed to test the effects of sub-lethal doses (1, 10 Gy) of C and Ti heavy ions, provided at dry-seed stage, on the development of dwarf bean plants (Dolichos melanophtalmus DC.) to assess whether low doses of heavy ions may induce stimulation of specific physiological traits rather than cause constraints in plant growth and photosynthesis. To reach this goal, the life cycle of plants from irradiated seeds was followed from seed-to-seed. Plant development was monitored by recording plant height, leaf area, number of leaves, flowers and pods. Photosynthesis was monitored by fluorescence measurements and photosynthetic pigment content amount. The occurrence of oxidative stress, as well as plant capability to counteract the radiation-induced changes, was assessed by the determination of endogenous hydrogen peroxide production, acid ascorbic amount and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity. Our results showed that all plants complete the life cycle, producing new seeds; however C ions at dose of 10 Gy induced constraints in plant growth, seed production and leaf lamina expansion, compared to control and other treatments. Photosynthetic activity was also reduced by 10 Gy C treatment. Both C and Ti ions at dose of 10 Gy determined a significant an increase in intracellular hydrogen peroxide, ascorbic acid amount and PARP activity. The overall results indicate that both C and Ti ions at the dose of 10 Gy stimulate defense mechanisms in dwarf bean plants, thus preventing harmful consequences that may compromise plant viability.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/752387
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