Mitochondria are the powerhouse organelles present in all eukaryotic cells. They play a fundamental role in cell respiration, survival and metabolism. Stimulation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) by dedicated ligands and consequent activation of the cAMP·PKA pathway finely couple energy production and metabolism to cell growth and survival. Compartmentalization of PKA signaling at mitochondria by A-Kinase Anchor Proteins (AKAPs) ensures efficient transduction of signals generated at the cell membrane to the organelles, controlling important aspects of mitochondrial biology. Emerging evidence implicates mitochondria as essential bioenergetic elements of cancer cells that promote and support tumor growth and metastasis. In this context, mitochondria provide the building blocks for cellular organelles, cytoskeleton and membranes, and supply all the metabolic needs for the expansion and dissemination of actively replicating cancer cells. Functional interference with mitochondrial activity deeply impacts on cancer cell survival and proliferation. Therefore, mitochondria represent valuable targets of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of cancer patients. Understanding the biology of mitochondria, uncovering the molecular mechanisms regulating mitochondrial activity andmapping the relevant metabolic and signaling networks operating in cancer cells will undoubtly contribute to create a molecular platform to be used for the treatment of proliferative disorders. Here, we will highlight the emerging roles of signaling pathways acting downstream to GPCRs and their intersection with the ubiquitin proteasome system in the control of mitochondrial activity in different aspects of cancer cell biology.

The role of compartmentalized signaling pathways in the control of mitochondrial activities in cancer cells

Rinaldi, Laura;Delle Donne, Rossella;Borzacchiello, Domenica;Insabato, Luigi;Feliciello, Antonio
2018

Abstract

Mitochondria are the powerhouse organelles present in all eukaryotic cells. They play a fundamental role in cell respiration, survival and metabolism. Stimulation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) by dedicated ligands and consequent activation of the cAMP·PKA pathway finely couple energy production and metabolism to cell growth and survival. Compartmentalization of PKA signaling at mitochondria by A-Kinase Anchor Proteins (AKAPs) ensures efficient transduction of signals generated at the cell membrane to the organelles, controlling important aspects of mitochondrial biology. Emerging evidence implicates mitochondria as essential bioenergetic elements of cancer cells that promote and support tumor growth and metastasis. In this context, mitochondria provide the building blocks for cellular organelles, cytoskeleton and membranes, and supply all the metabolic needs for the expansion and dissemination of actively replicating cancer cells. Functional interference with mitochondrial activity deeply impacts on cancer cell survival and proliferation. Therefore, mitochondria represent valuable targets of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of cancer patients. Understanding the biology of mitochondria, uncovering the molecular mechanisms regulating mitochondrial activity andmapping the relevant metabolic and signaling networks operating in cancer cells will undoubtly contribute to create a molecular platform to be used for the treatment of proliferative disorders. Here, we will highlight the emerging roles of signaling pathways acting downstream to GPCRs and their intersection with the ubiquitin proteasome system in the control of mitochondrial activity in different aspects of cancer cell biology.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/745972
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