Several epidemiological studies suggest an increased incidence of thyroid carcinoma (TC) in recent years, especially for the papillary histotype (PTC), suggesting that specific carcinogens might promote molecular abnormalities that are typical of PTC. The increased incidence is probably attributed to more intensive and sensitive diagnostic procedures, even if recent data suggest that various toxic elements could explain the phenomenon. Ionizing radiation exposure represents the most accepted risk factor for differentiated thyroid cancer that includes both the follicular and papillary histotypes. In this review, we examined the other environmental carcinogens that play a role in TC, such as eating habits, living in volcanic areas, and xenobiotic elements. Among eating habits, iodine intake represents one of the more discussed elements, because its deficiency is associated with follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs), while its progressive increment seems to be responsible for PTC. The gas, ash, and lava emissions of volcanoes are composed of various toxic compounds that pollute ground water, vegetables, and animals, contaminating humans via the food chain. Finally, the risk of developing PTC has also been associated with exposure of the population to xenobiotics in the environment or in the home. Their carcinogenic effects are probably caused by their accumulation, but additional studies are necessary to better understand the mechanisms of action.

Nutritional and Environmental Factors in Thyroid Carcinogenesis / Nettore, Immacolata Cristina; Colao, Annamaria; Macchia, Paolo Emidio. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH. - ISSN 1660-4601. - 15:8(2018), p. 1735. [10.3390/ijerph15081735]

Nutritional and Environmental Factors in Thyroid Carcinogenesis

Nettore, Immacolata Cristina
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Colao, Annamaria
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Macchia, Paolo Emidio
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
2018

Abstract

Several epidemiological studies suggest an increased incidence of thyroid carcinoma (TC) in recent years, especially for the papillary histotype (PTC), suggesting that specific carcinogens might promote molecular abnormalities that are typical of PTC. The increased incidence is probably attributed to more intensive and sensitive diagnostic procedures, even if recent data suggest that various toxic elements could explain the phenomenon. Ionizing radiation exposure represents the most accepted risk factor for differentiated thyroid cancer that includes both the follicular and papillary histotypes. In this review, we examined the other environmental carcinogens that play a role in TC, such as eating habits, living in volcanic areas, and xenobiotic elements. Among eating habits, iodine intake represents one of the more discussed elements, because its deficiency is associated with follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs), while its progressive increment seems to be responsible for PTC. The gas, ash, and lava emissions of volcanoes are composed of various toxic compounds that pollute ground water, vegetables, and animals, contaminating humans via the food chain. Finally, the risk of developing PTC has also been associated with exposure of the population to xenobiotics in the environment or in the home. Their carcinogenic effects are probably caused by their accumulation, but additional studies are necessary to better understand the mechanisms of action.
2018
Nutritional and Environmental Factors in Thyroid Carcinogenesis / Nettore, Immacolata Cristina; Colao, Annamaria; Macchia, Paolo Emidio. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH. - ISSN 1660-4601. - 15:8(2018), p. 1735. [10.3390/ijerph15081735]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/720141
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