Elasticity of myocardium is mostly due to elasticity of cardiomyocytes and is essential for cardiomyocyte alignment and differentiation. Cardiac decellularized ECM (d-ECM) is emerging as natural scaffold to promote and support myocardial regeneration. It is noteworthy that cardiac d-ECM is obtained through complete removal of cardiomyocytes with loss of elasticity. We hypothesize that decellularized skin might be an easily accessible, viable alternative for myocardium regeneration, as decellularization is unlikely to cause loss of skin elasticity, provided by elastic fibers rather than by resident cells. Skin fragments from patients undergoing plastic surgery were decellularized through novel simple and fast protocol. Decellularized Human Skin (d-HuSk) obtained was assayed in quantitative dye-binding method to measure content of elastin, while elastin distribution was evaluated on histological sections by Paraldehyde Fuchsin Gomori and Weigert Van Gieson stainings. d-Husk was then sectioned and used as scaffold to prepare three-dimensional culture of cardiac primitive cells (CPCs). Then, survival and ability of CPC cultured on d-HuSk to differentiate towards cardiac myocytes was evaluated at gene and protein level. Histological and quantitative analysis provided evidence of effective decellularization, preserved tissue architecture and retention of elastin. CPCs engrafted onto d-Husk, survived, and retained expression of markers specific for cardiac myocytes at gene and protein level.Our study provides compelling evidence that common signals act in cardiac and skin microenvironment to maintain CPC ability to differentiate towards cardiac muscle and that skin holds promise as an alternate biological scaffold for cardiovascular regenerative medicine.

From Cover to Core: Acellular Human Dermis for the Regeneration of Human Heart

Castaldo Clotilde;Nurzynska Daria;Romano Veronica;Sacco Anna Maria;Belviso Immacolata;Di Gennaro Mariagrazia;Carfora Antonia;Avagliano Angelica;Schonauer Fabrizio;Montagnani Stefania;Di Meglio Franca
2017

Abstract

Elasticity of myocardium is mostly due to elasticity of cardiomyocytes and is essential for cardiomyocyte alignment and differentiation. Cardiac decellularized ECM (d-ECM) is emerging as natural scaffold to promote and support myocardial regeneration. It is noteworthy that cardiac d-ECM is obtained through complete removal of cardiomyocytes with loss of elasticity. We hypothesize that decellularized skin might be an easily accessible, viable alternative for myocardium regeneration, as decellularization is unlikely to cause loss of skin elasticity, provided by elastic fibers rather than by resident cells. Skin fragments from patients undergoing plastic surgery were decellularized through novel simple and fast protocol. Decellularized Human Skin (d-HuSk) obtained was assayed in quantitative dye-binding method to measure content of elastin, while elastin distribution was evaluated on histological sections by Paraldehyde Fuchsin Gomori and Weigert Van Gieson stainings. d-Husk was then sectioned and used as scaffold to prepare three-dimensional culture of cardiac primitive cells (CPCs). Then, survival and ability of CPC cultured on d-HuSk to differentiate towards cardiac myocytes was evaluated at gene and protein level. Histological and quantitative analysis provided evidence of effective decellularization, preserved tissue architecture and retention of elastin. CPCs engrafted onto d-Husk, survived, and retained expression of markers specific for cardiac myocytes at gene and protein level.Our study provides compelling evidence that common signals act in cardiac and skin microenvironment to maintain CPC ability to differentiate towards cardiac muscle and that skin holds promise as an alternate biological scaffold for cardiovascular regenerative medicine.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/710067
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