AIM: Sclerosing cholangitis (SC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease that is being increasingly diagnosed in childhood. The long-term course and prognosis of pediatric SC are poorly described. METHODS: We reviewed data of pediatric SC patients, followed in two referral centers, during a period of up to 20 years. We aimed to evaluate long-term outcomes according to SC phenotype. RESULTS: Among 45 patients (median age, 10.4 years; male patients, 73.4%) 29 (64.4%) were asymptomatic at presentation. Twenty patients (44%) had a concomitant inflammatory bowel disease (SC/IBD). Autoimmune features were found in 20 patients (44%). Liver biopsy showed severe fibrosis or cirrhosis in 32% of cases. Patients with SC alone had a higher rate of interface hepatitis at liver biopsy than SC/IBD patients. All children received ursodeoxycholic acid at diagnosis, and 17 received steroids and/or azathioprine. After a mean follow-up of 8.7 ± 5.6 years, all patients were alive and seven developed at least one liver-related complication. At the end of follow-up, 10 patients stopped immunosuppressants and two had no therapy. Only two patients underwent liver transplantation. Complication-free survival did not differ between SC/IBD and SC patients, but survival was longer in patients without autoimmune features. CONCLUSIONS: In our early diagnosed cohort, the 9-year survival with native liver was better than that reported in other studies. Approximately 15% of patients developed liver-related disease complications, less than previously reported. The long-term course of SC was negatively influenced by the presence of autoimmune features, but not by concomitant IBD.

A promising medium-term follow-up of pediatric sclerosing cholangitis: Mild phenotype or early diagnosis?

Ranucci, Giusy;Miele, Erasmo;Cucchiara, Salvatore;Iorio, Raffaele
2018

Abstract

AIM: Sclerosing cholangitis (SC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease that is being increasingly diagnosed in childhood. The long-term course and prognosis of pediatric SC are poorly described. METHODS: We reviewed data of pediatric SC patients, followed in two referral centers, during a period of up to 20 years. We aimed to evaluate long-term outcomes according to SC phenotype. RESULTS: Among 45 patients (median age, 10.4 years; male patients, 73.4%) 29 (64.4%) were asymptomatic at presentation. Twenty patients (44%) had a concomitant inflammatory bowel disease (SC/IBD). Autoimmune features were found in 20 patients (44%). Liver biopsy showed severe fibrosis or cirrhosis in 32% of cases. Patients with SC alone had a higher rate of interface hepatitis at liver biopsy than SC/IBD patients. All children received ursodeoxycholic acid at diagnosis, and 17 received steroids and/or azathioprine. After a mean follow-up of 8.7 ± 5.6 years, all patients were alive and seven developed at least one liver-related complication. At the end of follow-up, 10 patients stopped immunosuppressants and two had no therapy. Only two patients underwent liver transplantation. Complication-free survival did not differ between SC/IBD and SC patients, but survival was longer in patients without autoimmune features. CONCLUSIONS: In our early diagnosed cohort, the 9-year survival with native liver was better than that reported in other studies. Approximately 15% of patients developed liver-related disease complications, less than previously reported. The long-term course of SC was negatively influenced by the presence of autoimmune features, but not by concomitant IBD.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/710005
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