OBJECTIVE: Cognitive frailty is a condition recently defined by operationalized criteria describing the simultaneous presence of physical frailty and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Two subtypes for this clinical construct have been proposed: "potentially reversible" cognitive frailty (physical frailty plus MCI) and "reversible" cognitive frailty (physical frailty plus pre-MCI subjective cognitive decline). Here the prevalence of a potentially reversible cognitive frailty model was estimated. It was also evaluated if introducing a diagnosis of MCI in older subjects with physical frailty could have an additive role on the risk of dementia, disability, and all-cause mortality in comparison with frailty state or MCI condition alone, with analyses separately performed for inflammatory state. METHODS: In 2,373 individuals from the population-based Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging with a 3.5-year-follow-up, we operationally categorized older individuals without dementia into four groups: non-frail/non-MCI, non-frail/MCI, frail/non-MCI, and frail/MCI. RESULTS: The prevalence of potentially reversible cognitive frailty was 1%, increasing with age and more represented in women than in men, and all groups were associated with significant increased incident rate ratios of dementia, disability, and mortality. A significant difference in rates of disability has been found between the MCI and non-MCI groups (contrasts of adjusted predictions: 0.461; 95% confidence interval: 0.187-0.735) in frail individuals with high inflammatory states (fibrinogen >339 mg/dL). CONCLUSION: In older individuals without dementia and with elevated inflammation, a potentially reversible cognitive frailty model could have a significant additional predictive effect on the risk of disability than the single conditions of frailty or MCI.

Additive Role of a Potentially Reversible Cognitive Frailty Model and Inflammatory State on the Risk of Disability: The Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging

ABETE, PASQUALE;Cacciatore F;
2017

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Cognitive frailty is a condition recently defined by operationalized criteria describing the simultaneous presence of physical frailty and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Two subtypes for this clinical construct have been proposed: "potentially reversible" cognitive frailty (physical frailty plus MCI) and "reversible" cognitive frailty (physical frailty plus pre-MCI subjective cognitive decline). Here the prevalence of a potentially reversible cognitive frailty model was estimated. It was also evaluated if introducing a diagnosis of MCI in older subjects with physical frailty could have an additive role on the risk of dementia, disability, and all-cause mortality in comparison with frailty state or MCI condition alone, with analyses separately performed for inflammatory state. METHODS: In 2,373 individuals from the population-based Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging with a 3.5-year-follow-up, we operationally categorized older individuals without dementia into four groups: non-frail/non-MCI, non-frail/MCI, frail/non-MCI, and frail/MCI. RESULTS: The prevalence of potentially reversible cognitive frailty was 1%, increasing with age and more represented in women than in men, and all groups were associated with significant increased incident rate ratios of dementia, disability, and mortality. A significant difference in rates of disability has been found between the MCI and non-MCI groups (contrasts of adjusted predictions: 0.461; 95% confidence interval: 0.187-0.735) in frail individuals with high inflammatory states (fibrinogen >339 mg/dL). CONCLUSION: In older individuals without dementia and with elevated inflammation, a potentially reversible cognitive frailty model could have a significant additional predictive effect on the risk of disability than the single conditions of frailty or MCI.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Solfrizzi 2017b.pdf

non disponibili

Licenza: Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 510.09 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
510.09 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/691209
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 63
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 60
social impact