The objective was to provide the current state of the art regarding the role of vitamin D in chronic diseases (osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, dementia, autism, type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, male and female fertility). The document was drawn up by panelists that provided their contribution according to their own scientific expertise. Each scientific expert supplied a first draft manuscript on a specific aspect of the document's topic that was subjected to voting by all experts as "yes" (agreement with the content and/or wording) or "no" (disagreement). The adopted rule was that statements supported by ≥75 % of votes would be immediately accepted, while those with <25 % would be rejected outright. Others would be subjected to further discussion and subsequent voting, where ≥67 % support or, in an eventual third round, a majority of ≥50 % would be needed. This document finds that the current evidence support a role for vitamin D in bone health but not in other health conditions. However, subjects with vitamin D deficiency have been found to be at high risk of developing chronic diseases. Therefore, although at the present time there is not sufficient evidence to recommend vitamin D supplementation as treatment of chronic diseases, the treatment of vitamin D deficiency should be desiderable in order to reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases.

Vitamin D and chronic diseases: the current state of the art / Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Altieri, Barbara; Annweiler, Cedric; Balercia, Giancarlo; Pal, H. B; Boucher, Barbara J; Cannell, John J; Foresta, Carlo; Grübler, Martin R; Kotsa, Kalliopi; Mascitelli, Luca; März, Winfried; Orio, Francesco; Pilz, Stefan; Tirabassi, Giacomo; Colao, Annamaria. - In: ARCHIVES OF TOXICOLOGY. - ISSN 0340-5761. - 91:1(2017), pp. 97-107-107. [10.1007/s00204-016-1804-x]

Vitamin D and chronic diseases: the current state of the art

Muscogiuri, Giovanna;ORIO, FRANCESCO;COLAO, ANNAMARIA
2017

Abstract

The objective was to provide the current state of the art regarding the role of vitamin D in chronic diseases (osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, dementia, autism, type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, male and female fertility). The document was drawn up by panelists that provided their contribution according to their own scientific expertise. Each scientific expert supplied a first draft manuscript on a specific aspect of the document's topic that was subjected to voting by all experts as "yes" (agreement with the content and/or wording) or "no" (disagreement). The adopted rule was that statements supported by ≥75 % of votes would be immediately accepted, while those with <25 % would be rejected outright. Others would be subjected to further discussion and subsequent voting, where ≥67 % support or, in an eventual third round, a majority of ≥50 % would be needed. This document finds that the current evidence support a role for vitamin D in bone health but not in other health conditions. However, subjects with vitamin D deficiency have been found to be at high risk of developing chronic diseases. Therefore, although at the present time there is not sufficient evidence to recommend vitamin D supplementation as treatment of chronic diseases, the treatment of vitamin D deficiency should be desiderable in order to reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases.
2017
Vitamin D and chronic diseases: the current state of the art / Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Altieri, Barbara; Annweiler, Cedric; Balercia, Giancarlo; Pal, H. B; Boucher, Barbara J; Cannell, John J; Foresta, Carlo; Grübler, Martin R; Kotsa, Kalliopi; Mascitelli, Luca; März, Winfried; Orio, Francesco; Pilz, Stefan; Tirabassi, Giacomo; Colao, Annamaria. - In: ARCHIVES OF TOXICOLOGY. - ISSN 0340-5761. - 91:1(2017), pp. 97-107-107. [10.1007/s00204-016-1804-x]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/680533
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