The streets of Pozzuoli, a small city near Naples, contain fragments and traces of the ancient road layout as signs that gave the possibility to researchers to reconstruct its history. The presence of these signs needs now to emerge and become guide for a contemporary design project. The city of Pozzuoli is too fragmented and tampered. The infrastructure that makes possible the mend of all shreds and torn parts of the urban structure working in a thorough and specific way (that these fragile contexts require) is the space of the street. We made a research project to define a new urban strategy. A public path anchored on five fixed points: the Temple of Neptune, the Flavian Amphitheatre, Villa Avellino with its tanks, the Collegia of Tibicines and Rione Terra. The goal for the project is the construction of a strong public pedestrian path that has to be incisive in the construction of the atmosphere and character of the city and able to connect public spaces of the city with the archaeological sites to guide both locals and tourists with clarity and logical evidence. The result is a project of the ground where the street represents the permanent element and the founding fact of the city. The archaeology as a pretext of the project of the street and then not as an end. The most important project reference was the street of the Acropolis in Athens by Pikionis, where the ground speaks the same language of the architecture of the city. Rem Koolhaas said “the street is dead"(Koolhas, 1995), we strongly oppose "the street is still alive", thanks to the presence of archaeology which with their physical presence are a silent reminder: building on the existing is the only possibility to save the authentic atmosphere and characters of the city.

Archaeology as a strategy for an urban project

IZZO, FERRUCCIO;ASCOLESE, MARIANNA;CALDERONI, ALBERTO
;
CESTARELLO, VANNA
2016

Abstract

The streets of Pozzuoli, a small city near Naples, contain fragments and traces of the ancient road layout as signs that gave the possibility to researchers to reconstruct its history. The presence of these signs needs now to emerge and become guide for a contemporary design project. The city of Pozzuoli is too fragmented and tampered. The infrastructure that makes possible the mend of all shreds and torn parts of the urban structure working in a thorough and specific way (that these fragile contexts require) is the space of the street. We made a research project to define a new urban strategy. A public path anchored on five fixed points: the Temple of Neptune, the Flavian Amphitheatre, Villa Avellino with its tanks, the Collegia of Tibicines and Rione Terra. The goal for the project is the construction of a strong public pedestrian path that has to be incisive in the construction of the atmosphere and character of the city and able to connect public spaces of the city with the archaeological sites to guide both locals and tourists with clarity and logical evidence. The result is a project of the ground where the street represents the permanent element and the founding fact of the city. The archaeology as a pretext of the project of the street and then not as an end. The most important project reference was the street of the Acropolis in Athens by Pikionis, where the ground speaks the same language of the architecture of the city. Rem Koolhaas said “the street is dead"(Koolhas, 1995), we strongly oppose "the street is still alive", thanks to the presence of archaeology which with their physical presence are a silent reminder: building on the existing is the only possibility to save the authentic atmosphere and characters of the city.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
NDU.pdf

solo utenti autorizzati

Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Licenza: Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 2.87 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
2.87 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/665924
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact