The pulmonary artery autograft (PA) is the ideal substitute for aortic valve disease in children and young adult. However, it is harnessed by the issue of long-term dilation and regurgitation, often requiring surgery. PA implanted in aortic position during the growth phase in children undergoes a process of mechanical remodeling. We previously developed a semiresorbable armored prosthesis able to mechanically sustain the neoaorta preventing dilation and to gradually integrate with the PA wall inducing a progressive arterial-like tissue positive remodeling. We also described the mechanisms of growth, remodeling and stress shielding of the reinforced PA through a mathematical model. We sought to demonstrate the biological counterpart and the potential molecular mechanisms underlying this histological and mechanical remodeling. A specific mathematical model was developed to describe mechanical behavior of the PA. Mallory trichrome red staining and immunohistochemistry for MMP-9 were performed to elucidate extracellular matrix remodeling phenomena. Apoptosis and cell proliferation were determined by TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry for Ki67, respectively. An histological remodeling phenomenon sustained by increased level of MMP-9, augmented cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis in the reinforced PA was demonstrated. The mathematical model predicted the biomechanical behavior subtended by the histological changes of the PA in these settings. Changes in metalloproteinases (MMP-9), cell proliferation and apoptosis are the main actors in the remodeling process occurring after transposition of the PA into systemic regimens. Use of semiresorbable reinforcements might induce a positive remodeling of the PA in the context of Ross operation.

Biomechanics drive histological wall remodeling of neoaortic root: A mathematical model to study the expression levels of ki 67, metalloprotease, and apoptosis transition

FRALDI, MASSIMILIANO;CAROTENUTO, ANGELO ROSARIO;MONTAGNANI, STEFANIA;CASTALDO, CLOTILDE;
2016

Abstract

The pulmonary artery autograft (PA) is the ideal substitute for aortic valve disease in children and young adult. However, it is harnessed by the issue of long-term dilation and regurgitation, often requiring surgery. PA implanted in aortic position during the growth phase in children undergoes a process of mechanical remodeling. We previously developed a semiresorbable armored prosthesis able to mechanically sustain the neoaorta preventing dilation and to gradually integrate with the PA wall inducing a progressive arterial-like tissue positive remodeling. We also described the mechanisms of growth, remodeling and stress shielding of the reinforced PA through a mathematical model. We sought to demonstrate the biological counterpart and the potential molecular mechanisms underlying this histological and mechanical remodeling. A specific mathematical model was developed to describe mechanical behavior of the PA. Mallory trichrome red staining and immunohistochemistry for MMP-9 were performed to elucidate extracellular matrix remodeling phenomena. Apoptosis and cell proliferation were determined by TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry for Ki67, respectively. An histological remodeling phenomenon sustained by increased level of MMP-9, augmented cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis in the reinforced PA was demonstrated. The mathematical model predicted the biomechanical behavior subtended by the histological changes of the PA in these settings. Changes in metalloproteinases (MMP-9), cell proliferation and apoptosis are the main actors in the remodeling process occurring after transposition of the PA into systemic regimens. Use of semiresorbable reinforcements might induce a positive remodeling of the PA in the context of Ross operation.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2016_FRALDI_BIOMEDICAL_MATERIALS_A.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Licenza: Accesso privato/ristretto
Dimensione 628.99 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
628.99 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/659039
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 21
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 25
social impact