“Serious Mental Illness (SMI)” (Marquez et al. 2011) is an umbrella term covering multiple diagnoses (i. e. schizophrenia, but also bipolar and psychosis) that prompt, within the family, organizational efforts aimed at treatment and support which end up inevitably involving the whole family group (Kate et al., 2013; Nair et al., 2010). Many studies highlight the influence of the peculiarities of the social contexts in which they live. We present here a descriptive investigation about the needs of the caregivers of patients with severe mental illness (SMI) living in a working-class neighborhood of a Southern Italian city. Twelve caregivers were interviewed about their own emotional involvement and relationship with the patient by means of a semi-structured interview. Interviews were subjected to an categorial thematic analysis. The results reveal painful experiences of anguish and feelings of inadequacy stemming from care-giving, which gravely impact the caregivers' personal well-being and family relations. SMI is described as a worrisome and invasive cultural construct, because of its unfathomable. These emotional factors are further deteriorated by the cultural representation of mental disorders in a disadvantaged district, which magnifies experiences of loneliness, stigma and shame. We highlight the importance that services could be enhanced by shared specific care practices, in a multidisciplinary team, for caregivers and their relative living in disadvantaged communities. It is paramount to promote processes of elaboration and comprehension of SMI and reshape the dynamics of mutual control present in the caregiverrelative relationship, and also to support their feelings of loneliness related to high levels of social stigma typical of suburbs, in both the therapeutic setting and the integration with the local community.

Family burden between social stigma and loneliness. An exploratory investigation with Principal Caregivers (PCs) of patients with Serious Mental Illness (SMI) living in a disadvantage district in Italy

DICE', FRANCESCA;
2015

Abstract

“Serious Mental Illness (SMI)” (Marquez et al. 2011) is an umbrella term covering multiple diagnoses (i. e. schizophrenia, but also bipolar and psychosis) that prompt, within the family, organizational efforts aimed at treatment and support which end up inevitably involving the whole family group (Kate et al., 2013; Nair et al., 2010). Many studies highlight the influence of the peculiarities of the social contexts in which they live. We present here a descriptive investigation about the needs of the caregivers of patients with severe mental illness (SMI) living in a working-class neighborhood of a Southern Italian city. Twelve caregivers were interviewed about their own emotional involvement and relationship with the patient by means of a semi-structured interview. Interviews were subjected to an categorial thematic analysis. The results reveal painful experiences of anguish and feelings of inadequacy stemming from care-giving, which gravely impact the caregivers' personal well-being and family relations. SMI is described as a worrisome and invasive cultural construct, because of its unfathomable. These emotional factors are further deteriorated by the cultural representation of mental disorders in a disadvantaged district, which magnifies experiences of loneliness, stigma and shame. We highlight the importance that services could be enhanced by shared specific care practices, in a multidisciplinary team, for caregivers and their relative living in disadvantaged communities. It is paramount to promote processes of elaboration and comprehension of SMI and reshape the dynamics of mutual control present in the caregiverrelative relationship, and also to support their feelings of loneliness related to high levels of social stigma typical of suburbs, in both the therapeutic setting and the integration with the local community.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/658352
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact