Purpose of review: The purpose of this review is to present an overview on the potential role of gut microbiota as target of intervention against food allergy. Recent findings: Many studies suggest a key pathogenetic role for gut microbiota modifications (dysbiosis) in food allergy development. Several factors responsible for dysbiosis have been associated with the occurrence of food allergy, such as caesarean delivery, lack of breast milk, drugs use (mainly antibiotics and gastric acidity inhibitors), antiseptic agents use, and low fibers/hight fat diet. No specific bacterial taxa have been consistently associated with food allergy, but evidence suggests that gut dysbiosis occurs even before food allergy signs and symptoms presentation. Data from animal and human studies highlight the ability of particular bacterial taxa to ferment dietary fibers for the production of short chain fatty acids that affect host immunity and help to explain their health-promoting role. Summary: Modulation of gut microbiota composition and/or function represents a promising strategy for treatment and prevention of food allergy in childhood. Key Words: butyrate, dysbiosis, oral tolerance, probiotics, short chain fatty acids Abbreviations: BLG, beta-lactoglobulin, CMA, cow’s milk allergy, EHCF, extensively hydrolyzed casein formula, FA, food allergy, HDAC, histone deacetylase, LGG, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, PBMCs, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, SCFAs, short chain fatty aci

Gut Microbiota as a Target for Food Allergy

DI COSTANZO, MARGHERITA;BERNI CANANI, ROBERTO
2016

Abstract

Purpose of review: The purpose of this review is to present an overview on the potential role of gut microbiota as target of intervention against food allergy. Recent findings: Many studies suggest a key pathogenetic role for gut microbiota modifications (dysbiosis) in food allergy development. Several factors responsible for dysbiosis have been associated with the occurrence of food allergy, such as caesarean delivery, lack of breast milk, drugs use (mainly antibiotics and gastric acidity inhibitors), antiseptic agents use, and low fibers/hight fat diet. No specific bacterial taxa have been consistently associated with food allergy, but evidence suggests that gut dysbiosis occurs even before food allergy signs and symptoms presentation. Data from animal and human studies highlight the ability of particular bacterial taxa to ferment dietary fibers for the production of short chain fatty acids that affect host immunity and help to explain their health-promoting role. Summary: Modulation of gut microbiota composition and/or function represents a promising strategy for treatment and prevention of food allergy in childhood. Key Words: butyrate, dysbiosis, oral tolerance, probiotics, short chain fatty acids Abbreviations: BLG, beta-lactoglobulin, CMA, cow’s milk allergy, EHCF, extensively hydrolyzed casein formula, FA, food allergy, HDAC, histone deacetylase, LGG, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, PBMCs, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, SCFAs, short chain fatty aci
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/648637
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