Background and aim: There is uncertainty regarding the prevention of migraine crises by changing the lifestyle of patients. The aim of this randomized, crossover intervention trial was to evaluate the effects of a low lipid intake on the incidence and severity of migraine crises, in comparison to a diet with moderate lipid intake. Methods and results: After a 2-month run-in when patients received preventive medication but were left on their habitual diet, a low-lipid or a normal-lipid diet was randomly prescribed for 3 months and thereafter diets were crossed over for the following 3 months. Headache was diagnosed based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders (IHCD) III criteria. The number and severity of attacks were assessed using a self-reported calendar. Adherence to the diet was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. An analysis was performed on the 83 episodic or chronic migraineurs (63 female and 20 male), in the age range of 18e57 years, who completed both intervention periods. Obese subjects had a significantly higher number of attacks than those overweight or with normal body weight (24.7 8, 16.3 12, and 15.6 11, respectively, p < 0.03) with a significant relationship between the body mass index (BMI) and the number of monthly attacks (r Z 0.238, p < 0.03). The number (2.9 3.7 vs. 6.8 7.5, p < 0.001) and severity (1.2 þ 0.9 vs. 1.7 0.9, p < 0.01) of attacks significantly decreased during both intervention periods, with a significant difference in favour of the lowlipid diet. Conclusions: In this group of patients, the low-lipid diet significantly affected the number and severity of migraine attacks in comparison to a normal-lipid diet.

Low-lipid diet reduces frequency and severity of acute migraine attacks

FERRARA, LIBERATO ALDO;PACIONI, DELIA;RUSSO, BARBARA FLORA;CARLINO, MARIA VIVIANA;GARGIULO, FRANCESCO;
2015

Abstract

Background and aim: There is uncertainty regarding the prevention of migraine crises by changing the lifestyle of patients. The aim of this randomized, crossover intervention trial was to evaluate the effects of a low lipid intake on the incidence and severity of migraine crises, in comparison to a diet with moderate lipid intake. Methods and results: After a 2-month run-in when patients received preventive medication but were left on their habitual diet, a low-lipid or a normal-lipid diet was randomly prescribed for 3 months and thereafter diets were crossed over for the following 3 months. Headache was diagnosed based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders (IHCD) III criteria. The number and severity of attacks were assessed using a self-reported calendar. Adherence to the diet was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. An analysis was performed on the 83 episodic or chronic migraineurs (63 female and 20 male), in the age range of 18e57 years, who completed both intervention periods. Obese subjects had a significantly higher number of attacks than those overweight or with normal body weight (24.7 8, 16.3 12, and 15.6 11, respectively, p < 0.03) with a significant relationship between the body mass index (BMI) and the number of monthly attacks (r Z 0.238, p < 0.03). The number (2.9 3.7 vs. 6.8 7.5, p < 0.001) and severity (1.2 þ 0.9 vs. 1.7 0.9, p < 0.01) of attacks significantly decreased during both intervention periods, with a significant difference in favour of the lowlipid diet. Conclusions: In this group of patients, the low-lipid diet significantly affected the number and severity of migraine attacks in comparison to a normal-lipid diet.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/622187
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