Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures have recently garnered great attention because they promote levels of cells differentiation and tissue organisation not possible in conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture systems. Cancer development is a complex process regulated by interactions between epithelial cells, activated stromal cells, and soluble and insoluble components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). As a consequence, in the field of cancer biology a 3D tumour model that accurately recreates the in vivo tumour phenotype would be a valuable tool for studying tumour biology and would allow better pre-clinical evaluation of anticancer drug candidates. Here, we review the 3D tumour models currently available and the more advanced techniques from the tissue-engineering field used to create a more clinically accurate ex vivo tumour model. Moreover, we highlight the drastic differences in drug responses between 3D and 2D models and give a glance to the emerging multi-organ microdevices that can mimic in vivo tissue-tissue interactions.

In vitro three-dimensional models in cancer research: A review

Urciuolo, F.;NETTI, PAOLO ANTONIO
2015

Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures have recently garnered great attention because they promote levels of cells differentiation and tissue organisation not possible in conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture systems. Cancer development is a complex process regulated by interactions between epithelial cells, activated stromal cells, and soluble and insoluble components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). As a consequence, in the field of cancer biology a 3D tumour model that accurately recreates the in vivo tumour phenotype would be a valuable tool for studying tumour biology and would allow better pre-clinical evaluation of anticancer drug candidates. Here, we review the 3D tumour models currently available and the more advanced techniques from the tissue-engineering field used to create a more clinically accurate ex vivo tumour model. Moreover, we highlight the drastic differences in drug responses between 3D and 2D models and give a glance to the emerging multi-organ microdevices that can mimic in vivo tissue-tissue interactions.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/619310
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 13
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 12
social impact