Peptide or protein ligands can be used for molecular decoration to enhance the functionality of synthetic materials. However, some skepticism has arisen about the efficacy of such strategy in practical contexts since serum proteins largely adsorb. To address this issue, it is crucial to ascertain whether a chemically conjugated integrin-binding peptide is fully recognized by a cell even if partially covered by a physisorbed layer of serum protein; in more general terms, if competitive protein fragments physisorbed onto the surface are distinguishable from those chemically anchored to it. Here, we engraft an RGD peptide on poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) surfaces and follow the dynamics of focal adhesion (FA) and cytoskeleton assembly at different times and culture conditions using a variety of analytical tools. Although the presence of serum protein covers the bioconjugated RGD significantly, after the first adhesion phase cells dig into the physisorbed layer and reach the submerged signal to establish a more stable adhesion structure (mature FAs). Although the spreading area index is not substantially affected by the presence of the RGD peptide, cells attached to chemically bound signals develop a stronger adhesive interaction with the materials and assemble a mechanically stable cytoskeleton. This demonstrates that cells are able to discriminate, via mechanosensoring, between adhesive motives belonging to physisorbed proteins and those firmly anchored on the material surface.

Ligand engagement on material surfaces is discriminated by cell mechanosensoring

BATTISTA, EDMONDO;CAUSA, FILIPPO;LETTERA, VINCENZO;PANZETTA, VALERIA;GUARNIERI, DANIELA;FUSCO, SABATO;GENTILE, Francesco;NETTI, PAOLO ANTONIO
2015

Abstract

Peptide or protein ligands can be used for molecular decoration to enhance the functionality of synthetic materials. However, some skepticism has arisen about the efficacy of such strategy in practical contexts since serum proteins largely adsorb. To address this issue, it is crucial to ascertain whether a chemically conjugated integrin-binding peptide is fully recognized by a cell even if partially covered by a physisorbed layer of serum protein; in more general terms, if competitive protein fragments physisorbed onto the surface are distinguishable from those chemically anchored to it. Here, we engraft an RGD peptide on poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) surfaces and follow the dynamics of focal adhesion (FA) and cytoskeleton assembly at different times and culture conditions using a variety of analytical tools. Although the presence of serum protein covers the bioconjugated RGD significantly, after the first adhesion phase cells dig into the physisorbed layer and reach the submerged signal to establish a more stable adhesion structure (mature FAs). Although the spreading area index is not substantially affected by the presence of the RGD peptide, cells attached to chemically bound signals develop a stronger adhesive interaction with the materials and assemble a mechanically stable cytoskeleton. This demonstrates that cells are able to discriminate, via mechanosensoring, between adhesive motives belonging to physisorbed proteins and those firmly anchored on the material surface.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/613319
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