Blood is a complex fluid with non-Newtonian characteristics and consists primarily of a concentrated suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) characterized by high deformability and aggregability. The majority of both research and clinical investigations on blood rheology is based on steady shear measurements aimed at determining blood viscosity as a function of shear rate. On the other hand, investigations of blood rheology in the linear viscoelastic regime are sparse in the literature and currently limited. In principle, small amplitude oscillatory flow is best suited to study blood microstructure and rheology under quasi-static conditions, which are relevant in a range of applications, from blood storage to blood aggregability testing. Here, we present the first systematic experimental investigation of blood rheological behavior in the linear viscoelastic regime, by performing oscillatory shear measurements by conventional bulk rheology. The storage (G′) and loss (G″) moduli of whole human blood have been measured over an extended range of frequencies [0.1–30 rad/s]. Data show that G″ predominates over G′ across the entire tested range of frequency. By comparing steady and oscillatory shear viscosity, it was found that the Cox-Merz rule is followed to a good approximation, with higher deviations at small shear rate/frequencies. The effects of RBC volume fraction and of aggregating media (i.e., dextran solution at two different concentrations) have been also investigated. Overall, our results are consistent with the behavior of a weakly attractive suspension, where RBCs form reversible aggregates that can be broken by the action of flow.

Blood linear viscoelasticity by small amplitude oscillatory flow

TOMAIUOLO, GIOVANNA;CARCIATI, ANTONIO;CASERTA, Sergio;GUIDO, STEFANO
2016

Abstract

Blood is a complex fluid with non-Newtonian characteristics and consists primarily of a concentrated suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) characterized by high deformability and aggregability. The majority of both research and clinical investigations on blood rheology is based on steady shear measurements aimed at determining blood viscosity as a function of shear rate. On the other hand, investigations of blood rheology in the linear viscoelastic regime are sparse in the literature and currently limited. In principle, small amplitude oscillatory flow is best suited to study blood microstructure and rheology under quasi-static conditions, which are relevant in a range of applications, from blood storage to blood aggregability testing. Here, we present the first systematic experimental investigation of blood rheological behavior in the linear viscoelastic regime, by performing oscillatory shear measurements by conventional bulk rheology. The storage (G′) and loss (G″) moduli of whole human blood have been measured over an extended range of frequencies [0.1–30 rad/s]. Data show that G″ predominates over G′ across the entire tested range of frequency. By comparing steady and oscillatory shear viscosity, it was found that the Cox-Merz rule is followed to a good approximation, with higher deviations at small shear rate/frequencies. The effects of RBC volume fraction and of aggregating media (i.e., dextran solution at two different concentrations) have been also investigated. Overall, our results are consistent with the behavior of a weakly attractive suspension, where RBCs form reversible aggregates that can be broken by the action of flow.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/613238
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