Introduction: Although attachment theory has been recognized as one of the main references for the study of the general well-being, little research has been focused on the attachment styles of transgender people. Attachment styles are deeply influenced by the earliest relationships with caregivers, which, for gender-nonconforming children, are often characterized by parental rejection. Consequently, transgender children and adults likely internalize societal stigma, developing internalized transphobia. The current research was aimed to explore the link between adult attachment and internalized transphobia. Method: Twenty-five male-to-female (MtF) and 23 female-to-male (FtM) transgender people participated in the survey filling in two self-report questionnaires: the Attachment Style Questionnaire and the Transgender Identity Survey. A cluster analysis, t-test, and multiple regression analysis were conducted to explore the link between attachment styles and internalized transphobia. Results: A greater prevalence of secure attachment styles was detected. Participants with secure attachment styles reported higher levels of positive transgender identity than those with insecure attachment styles. Secure attachment styles significantly affect positive transgender identity, while insecure attachment styles influence internalized transphobia. Conclusions: A clinical focus on the redefinition of the internal working models of transgender people can inform psychologically focused interventions that transgender people can benefit from.

Adult Attachment and Transgender Identity in the Italian Context: Clinical Implications and Suggestions for Further Research

Amodeo A. L.;Vitelli R.;Scandurra C.;Picariello S.;Valerio P.
2015

Abstract

Introduction: Although attachment theory has been recognized as one of the main references for the study of the general well-being, little research has been focused on the attachment styles of transgender people. Attachment styles are deeply influenced by the earliest relationships with caregivers, which, for gender-nonconforming children, are often characterized by parental rejection. Consequently, transgender children and adults likely internalize societal stigma, developing internalized transphobia. The current research was aimed to explore the link between adult attachment and internalized transphobia. Method: Twenty-five male-to-female (MtF) and 23 female-to-male (FtM) transgender people participated in the survey filling in two self-report questionnaires: the Attachment Style Questionnaire and the Transgender Identity Survey. A cluster analysis, t-test, and multiple regression analysis were conducted to explore the link between attachment styles and internalized transphobia. Results: A greater prevalence of secure attachment styles was detected. Participants with secure attachment styles reported higher levels of positive transgender identity than those with insecure attachment styles. Secure attachment styles significantly affect positive transgender identity, while insecure attachment styles influence internalized transphobia. Conclusions: A clinical focus on the redefinition of the internal working models of transgender people can inform psychologically focused interventions that transgender people can benefit from.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11588/609258
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