Fuel consumption or pollutant emissions can be assessed by coupling a microscopic traffic flow model with an instantaneous emission model. Traffic models are usually calibrated using goodness of fit indicators related to the traffic behavior. Thus, this paper investigates how such a calibration influences the accuracy of fuel consumption and NOx and PM estimations. Two traffic models are investigated: Newell and Gipps. It appears that the Gipps model provides the closest simulated trajectories when compared to real ones. Interestingly, a reverse ranking is observed for fuel consumption, NOx and PM emissions. For both models, the emissions of single vehicles are very sensitive to the calibration. This is confirmed by a global sensitivity analysis of the Gipps model that shows that non-optimal parameters significantly increase the variance of the outputs. Fortunately, this is no longer the case when emissions are calculated for a group of many vehicles. Indeed, the mean errors for platoons are close to 10% for the Gipps model and always lower than 4% for the Newell model. Another interesting property is that optimal parameters for each vehicle can be replaced by the mean values with no discrepancy for the Newell model and low discrepancies for the Gipps model when calculating the different emission outputs. Finally, this study presents preliminary results that show that multi-objective calibration methods are certainly the best direction for future works on the Gipps model. Indeed, the accuracy of vehicle emissions can be highly improved with negligible counterparts on the traffic model accuracy.

Does traffic-related calibration of car-following models provide accurate estimations of vehicle emissions?

MONTANINO, MARCELLO;PUNZO, VINCENZO;
2015

Abstract

Fuel consumption or pollutant emissions can be assessed by coupling a microscopic traffic flow model with an instantaneous emission model. Traffic models are usually calibrated using goodness of fit indicators related to the traffic behavior. Thus, this paper investigates how such a calibration influences the accuracy of fuel consumption and NOx and PM estimations. Two traffic models are investigated: Newell and Gipps. It appears that the Gipps model provides the closest simulated trajectories when compared to real ones. Interestingly, a reverse ranking is observed for fuel consumption, NOx and PM emissions. For both models, the emissions of single vehicles are very sensitive to the calibration. This is confirmed by a global sensitivity analysis of the Gipps model that shows that non-optimal parameters significantly increase the variance of the outputs. Fortunately, this is no longer the case when emissions are calculated for a group of many vehicles. Indeed, the mean errors for platoons are close to 10% for the Gipps model and always lower than 4% for the Newell model. Another interesting property is that optimal parameters for each vehicle can be replaced by the mean values with no discrepancy for the Newell model and low discrepancies for the Gipps model when calculating the different emission outputs. Finally, this study presents preliminary results that show that multi-objective calibration methods are certainly the best direction for future works on the Gipps model. Indeed, the accuracy of vehicle emissions can be highly improved with negligible counterparts on the traffic model accuracy.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/597108
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