Purpose Assess knowledge and awareness concerning human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, HPV-associated diseases, and the existence of a specific vaccine among non-HPV-screened Caucasian-European adults after the market introduction of HPV vaccines. Methods A cohort of 934 consecutive patients seeking their first medical help for uroandrologic purposes anonymously completed a 17-item questionnaire related to HPV. Data were compared with those of an age-comparable cohort of nurses (controls; n = 172). Results Knowledge and awareness of HPV infection were reported in 564 (51 %) and 735 (66.5 %) participants, respectively. Overall, 51.3 % participants were informed that HPV is sexually transmitted, but most reported not being aware that HPV infection can be associated with anogenital warts (61.7 %), female genitalia (46.6 %), penile (58.5 %), and oropharyngeal cancer (79.7 %). Only 36.5 % of the participants were informed regarding the existence of a specific vaccine. HPV knowledge was retrieved through the media and/or the Internet, at school, doctors, and relatives or friends in 395 (35.7 %), 155 (14 %), 97 (8.8 %), and 88 (8.0 %) participants, respectively. Multivariable analyses showed that female gender [odds ratio (OR) 3.08; p < 0.001; 95 % confidence interval 2.18–4.35] and educational status [high school diploma versus primary–secondary (OR 1.61; p = 0.03; 1.04–2.51); university degree versus primary–secondary (OR 2.89; p < 0.001; 1.83–4.57)] were significantly associated with awareness of HPV. Conclusions Only approximately half of the participants reported knowing what HPV infection is, even after the approval and market introduction of the HPV vaccine. Awareness about the existence and availability of a HPV vaccine was even lower.

Awareness and knowledge of human papillomavirus-related diseases are still dramatically insufficient in the era of high-coverage vaccination programs.

MIRONE, VINCENZO;
2015

Abstract

Purpose Assess knowledge and awareness concerning human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, HPV-associated diseases, and the existence of a specific vaccine among non-HPV-screened Caucasian-European adults after the market introduction of HPV vaccines. Methods A cohort of 934 consecutive patients seeking their first medical help for uroandrologic purposes anonymously completed a 17-item questionnaire related to HPV. Data were compared with those of an age-comparable cohort of nurses (controls; n = 172). Results Knowledge and awareness of HPV infection were reported in 564 (51 %) and 735 (66.5 %) participants, respectively. Overall, 51.3 % participants were informed that HPV is sexually transmitted, but most reported not being aware that HPV infection can be associated with anogenital warts (61.7 %), female genitalia (46.6 %), penile (58.5 %), and oropharyngeal cancer (79.7 %). Only 36.5 % of the participants were informed regarding the existence of a specific vaccine. HPV knowledge was retrieved through the media and/or the Internet, at school, doctors, and relatives or friends in 395 (35.7 %), 155 (14 %), 97 (8.8 %), and 88 (8.0 %) participants, respectively. Multivariable analyses showed that female gender [odds ratio (OR) 3.08; p < 0.001; 95 % confidence interval 2.18–4.35] and educational status [high school diploma versus primary–secondary (OR 1.61; p = 0.03; 1.04–2.51); university degree versus primary–secondary (OR 2.89; p < 0.001; 1.83–4.57)] were significantly associated with awareness of HPV. Conclusions Only approximately half of the participants reported knowing what HPV infection is, even after the approval and market introduction of the HPV vaccine. Awareness about the existence and availability of a HPV vaccine was even lower.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/593849
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