Abstract Artificial selection began to override natural selection in domesticated wild boar and other species about 10,000 years ago. The intentional selection of a desired phenotypic trait is a complex process, and comes along with unexpected or even unwanted changes in other traits, because of epistatic gene effects, and ontogenetic con- straints. The loss of brain mass in domestic ungulates is related to selection for reduced reaction to external stimuli. Evolutionary losses in body structures and genes were once considered mostly irreversible, in keeping with Dollo’s law. Here we studied the biochemical and the histological functioning of the free-living pigs (FLPs) olfactory system, to see if and to what extent does FLPs regain a full sense of smell, as compared to the domestic pigs and wild boar Sus scrofa. In our samples both wild boars and FLPs have significantly larger brain per unit mass than domestic pigs, and FLPs’ brains are not significantly smaller than wild boar’s. Similarly, both wild boars and FLPs have signifi- cantly higher cell density than domestic pigs in the olfac- tory mucosa. Yet, at the functional level, olfactory marker protein and neuropeptide Y, both of which are important to the correct functioning of the sense of smell, are fully expressed only in wild boar. These results suggest that FLPs reacquired structural, but not the biochemical capa- bility in their olfactory system.

A Dysfunctional Sense of Smell: The Irreversibility of Olfactory Evolution in Free-Living Pigs / Maselli, Valeria; Polese, Gianluca; Larson, G.; Raia, Pasquale; Forte, N.; Rippa, D.; Ligrone, R.; Vicidomini, Rosario; Fulgione, Domenico. - In: EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY. - ISSN 0071-3260. - 41:2(2014), pp. 229-239. [10.1007/s11692-013-9262-3]

A Dysfunctional Sense of Smell: The Irreversibility of Olfactory Evolution in Free-Living Pigs

MASELLI, VALERIA
Co-primo
;
POLESE, GIANLUCA
Co-primo
;
RAIA, PASQUALE;D. Rippa;R. Ligrone;VICIDOMINI, ROSARIO
Penultimo
;
FULGIONE, DOMENICO
Ultimo
2014

Abstract

Abstract Artificial selection began to override natural selection in domesticated wild boar and other species about 10,000 years ago. The intentional selection of a desired phenotypic trait is a complex process, and comes along with unexpected or even unwanted changes in other traits, because of epistatic gene effects, and ontogenetic con- straints. The loss of brain mass in domestic ungulates is related to selection for reduced reaction to external stimuli. Evolutionary losses in body structures and genes were once considered mostly irreversible, in keeping with Dollo’s law. Here we studied the biochemical and the histological functioning of the free-living pigs (FLPs) olfactory system, to see if and to what extent does FLPs regain a full sense of smell, as compared to the domestic pigs and wild boar Sus scrofa. In our samples both wild boars and FLPs have significantly larger brain per unit mass than domestic pigs, and FLPs’ brains are not significantly smaller than wild boar’s. Similarly, both wild boars and FLPs have signifi- cantly higher cell density than domestic pigs in the olfac- tory mucosa. Yet, at the functional level, olfactory marker protein and neuropeptide Y, both of which are important to the correct functioning of the sense of smell, are fully expressed only in wild boar. These results suggest that FLPs reacquired structural, but not the biochemical capa- bility in their olfactory system.
2014
A Dysfunctional Sense of Smell: The Irreversibility of Olfactory Evolution in Free-Living Pigs / Maselli, Valeria; Polese, Gianluca; Larson, G.; Raia, Pasquale; Forte, N.; Rippa, D.; Ligrone, R.; Vicidomini, Rosario; Fulgione, Domenico. - In: EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY. - ISSN 0071-3260. - 41:2(2014), pp. 229-239. [10.1007/s11692-013-9262-3]
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/567093
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