New studies are underway to find new methods for supporting longer storage of cooled stallion semen. It is known that high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause sperm pathology. The metalloprotein superoxide dismutase (SOD) is responsible for H2O2 and O2 production, by dismutation of superoxide radicals. The aim of this study is to assess the quality of chilled stallion semen processed with extenders containing SOD at different concentrations as antioxidant additives. A total of 80 ejaculates collected from 5 standardbred stallions was divided into 5 aliquots treated as: native semen (control 1); native semen diluted 1:3 with Kenney semen extender (control 2); spermatozoa diluted after centrifugation in extender without (control 3) or with SOD at 25 IU/ml (experimental 1) or 50IU/ml (experimental 2). Each sample was analyzed for motility, viability and acrosome status, immediately after semen preparation and again after storage at 5 °C for 24h, 48h and 72h. Acrosome integrity was evaluated by Chlortetracycline (CTC) and Fluorescent-labeled peanut lectin agglutinin (PNA-FITC conjugated staining). A proteomic approach of quantifying extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) was also evaluated as an indirect indicator of oxidative stress. In all samples sperm progressive motility and sperm acrosomal integrity showed a significant reduction between fresh and cooled spermatozoa at 24h, 48h and 72h. Quality parameters of sperm were significantly higher (Progressive Motility P0.01; Viability P0.001) in aliquots supplemented with SOD.ERKphosphorylation was statistically higher (P0.01) in aliquots without SOD. The Authors concluded that addition of SOD to semen extenders improves the quality of chilled equine semen and reduces ERK activation.

Effect of sod (superoxide dismutase) protein supplementation in semen extenders on motility, viability, acrosome status and ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) protein phosphorylation of chilled stallion spermatozoa

COCCHIA, NATASCIA;PASOLINI, MARIA PIA;ROSAPANE, ISABELLA;SICA, ALESSANDRO;TORTORA, GENNARO;LORIZIO, ROBERTO;
2011

Abstract

New studies are underway to find new methods for supporting longer storage of cooled stallion semen. It is known that high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause sperm pathology. The metalloprotein superoxide dismutase (SOD) is responsible for H2O2 and O2 production, by dismutation of superoxide radicals. The aim of this study is to assess the quality of chilled stallion semen processed with extenders containing SOD at different concentrations as antioxidant additives. A total of 80 ejaculates collected from 5 standardbred stallions was divided into 5 aliquots treated as: native semen (control 1); native semen diluted 1:3 with Kenney semen extender (control 2); spermatozoa diluted after centrifugation in extender without (control 3) or with SOD at 25 IU/ml (experimental 1) or 50IU/ml (experimental 2). Each sample was analyzed for motility, viability and acrosome status, immediately after semen preparation and again after storage at 5 °C for 24h, 48h and 72h. Acrosome integrity was evaluated by Chlortetracycline (CTC) and Fluorescent-labeled peanut lectin agglutinin (PNA-FITC conjugated staining). A proteomic approach of quantifying extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) was also evaluated as an indirect indicator of oxidative stress. In all samples sperm progressive motility and sperm acrosomal integrity showed a significant reduction between fresh and cooled spermatozoa at 24h, 48h and 72h. Quality parameters of sperm were significantly higher (Progressive Motility P0.01; Viability P0.001) in aliquots supplemented with SOD.ERKphosphorylation was statistically higher (P0.01) in aliquots without SOD. The Authors concluded that addition of SOD to semen extenders improves the quality of chilled equine semen and reduces ERK activation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/413073
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