Understanding the influence of a controlled spatial distribution of biological cues on cell activities can be useful to design ‘‘cell instructive” materials, able to control and guide the formation of engineered tissues in vivo and in vitro. To this purpose, biochemical and mechanical properties of the resulting biomaterial must be carefully designed and controlled. In this work, the effect of covalently immobilized RGD peptide gradients on poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate hydrogels on cell behaviour was studied. We set up a mechanical device generating gradients based on a fluidic chamber. Cell response to RGD gradients with different slope (0.7, 1 and 2 mM cm1) was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed by evaluating cell adhesion and, in particular, cell migration, compared to cells seeded on hydrogels with uniform distribu- tion of RGD peptides. To evaluate the influence of RGD gradient and to exclude any concentration effect on cell response, all analyses were carried out in a specific region of the gradients which displayed the same average concentration of RGD (1.5 mM). Results suggest that cells recognize the RGD gradient and adhere onto it assuming a stretched shape. Moreover, cells tend to migrate in the direction of the gra- dient, as their speed is higher than that of cells migrating on hydrogels with a uniform distribution of RGD and increases by increasing RGD gradient steepness. This increment is due to an augmentation of bias speed component of the mean squared speed, that is, the drift of the cell population migrating on the anisotropic surface provided by the RGD gradient.

Covalently immobilized RGD gradient on PEG hydrogel scaffold influences cell migration parameters

VENTRE, MAURIZIO;MARASCO, DANIELA;NETTI, PAOLO ANTONIO
2010

Abstract

Understanding the influence of a controlled spatial distribution of biological cues on cell activities can be useful to design ‘‘cell instructive” materials, able to control and guide the formation of engineered tissues in vivo and in vitro. To this purpose, biochemical and mechanical properties of the resulting biomaterial must be carefully designed and controlled. In this work, the effect of covalently immobilized RGD peptide gradients on poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate hydrogels on cell behaviour was studied. We set up a mechanical device generating gradients based on a fluidic chamber. Cell response to RGD gradients with different slope (0.7, 1 and 2 mM cm1) was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed by evaluating cell adhesion and, in particular, cell migration, compared to cells seeded on hydrogels with uniform distribu- tion of RGD peptides. To evaluate the influence of RGD gradient and to exclude any concentration effect on cell response, all analyses were carried out in a specific region of the gradients which displayed the same average concentration of RGD (1.5 mM). Results suggest that cells recognize the RGD gradient and adhere onto it assuming a stretched shape. Moreover, cells tend to migrate in the direction of the gra- dient, as their speed is higher than that of cells migrating on hydrogels with a uniform distribution of RGD and increases by increasing RGD gradient steepness. This increment is due to an augmentation of bias speed component of the mean squared speed, that is, the drift of the cell population migrating on the anisotropic surface provided by the RGD gradient.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11588/389644
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